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Posts by: Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu

Te Pao a Tahu tutor Corban Te Aika reflects

Corban Te Aika, who is the Pouako/Kaitātaki Tāne (the tutor and male leader) for Te Pao a Tahu is still buzzing 24 hours after the rōpū walked on stage at Te Matatini 2015. Te Pao o Tahu was the first of the Waitaha groups to perform.

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Competition Begins

An eerie mist hung over North Hagley Park for the first morning of Te Matatini 2015 competition. Committed kapa haka fans arrived early, as soon as the gates opened at 7am, all vying for the best spots and wrapping themselves in coats and blankets. One pair announced “We’re from Perth, this is cold for us,”…

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Te Matatini web series – episode 4

In this episode we talk with the planning coordinators who are setting up areas for Te Matatini. We also spend time with Mana Whenua, Ngāi Tūāhuriri, and discuss the planning and preparation of the pōwhiri.

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Te Matatini 2015 Pōwhiri

After nearly two years of planning, Te Matatini 2015 is underway in North Hagley Park, Christchurch. Around 5, 000 people were present for the Wednesday pōwhiri, which signalled the beginning of the 4-day kapa haka festival. Manuhiri (guests), were led into the park by the Ratana band, before pounamu was presented to representatives from the…

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1986 Polynesian Festival

In this episode we recollect the 1986 Polynesian Festival. We talk with the some of the members of the 1986 Polynesian Festival Organising Committee about their roles and responsibilities in the planning and during the festival. We also talk to some of the 1986 performers from Waitaha and discuss their practices and performance. We acknowledge…

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Te Matatini mahau arrives

Four containers holding the Te Matatini mahau arrived in Hagley Park this morning. The mahau (front porch) will be erected to frame the main stage for Te Matatini 2015, which will feature 45 kapa haka teams from throughout New Zealand, competing in a 4-day festival from March 4-8. The arrival of the containers signals the…

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Coming home

Tamar McLeod Sinclair may have left New Zealand on a one-way ticket back in 2005 to pursue her singing career but she still feels closely connected to her Ngāi Tahu whakapapa. Currently back in New Zealand for a whirlwind tour that includes one-off concerts in Auckland and Wellington, Tamar draws on her roots to deliver…

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Recording rock art

Since the South Island Māori Rock Art Project began surveying and recording in 1990, over 600 Māori rock art sites have been mapped and photographed; of those, 300 were new and had not been recorded previously. Te Ana Ngāi Tahu Rock Art Trust curator, Amanda Symon says the survey team has been steadily finding many…

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Guardians of the future

The Te Ana Ngāi Tahu Rock Art Centre is placing a stronger focus on the education sector in the hope of raising the profile of ancient rock art and encouraging a new generation of rock art guardians. In 2014, 3,420 school children from 33 schools took part in Te Ana activities and Te Ana Ngāi…

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