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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

The whakataukī mā pango, mā whero, ka oti ai te mahi (by black and red together the work is done) refers to the importance of collaboration and partnership, and I am struck by a sense of this as I turn the pages of this issue. On page 14 we catch up with award-winning actress and…

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From the CEO

Chief Executive Officer, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Arihia Bennett My Mother – a personal story This year Mother’s Day was significantly different for me, as it was exactly one week after my mother passed away. On this day I walked down the road to the urupā to visit my Mum, and as I stared…

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Whenua

Awarua (the Haast River) flows from Kā Tiritiri-o-te-moana (the Southern Alps) into Te Tai-o-Rehua (the Tasman Sea) north of Ōkahu (Jackson Bay). Awarua was part of the traditional travel route over Tioripātea (Haast Pass) and along the Makarore (Makarora River) that connected Te Tai Poutini (the West Coast) with lakes Wānaka and Hāwea. During the…

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Why the treaty should be included in our citizenship oath

Ka hao te Rakatahi Nā Nuku Tau Recently, there has been debate on whether or not the treaty should be included in our citizenship oath for new migrants. In my view, the Treaty of Waitangi is critical to Māori well-being, and essential to new migrant integration. Therefore, it should without doubt be recognised in the…

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Charitable status

It is by every measure a success story for the ages. From a position of total ownership of Te Waipounamu (Te Tau Ihu bits excluded) in 1840 to being virtually landless just 25 years later, the recovery is today complete. Ngāi Tahu is poised in the next few years to begin delivering social investment outcomes that may eventually see it overtake the central government in this respect.

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Āu kōrero
Letters to the Editor

Late last year TE KARAKA ran a story on kaumātua care and Whare Tiaki, a trailblazing taha Māori model that offers supported living for those kaumātua living alone and needing a bit of extra help. Te Whānau Oraka – ka piki te ora o kā tamariki me kā tāua pōua. My philosophy is: If you have well children and grandparents, you have a thriving whānau!

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Korowai of Hope

Whaka-Ora, Healthy Harbour – an aspirational plan to restore the cultural and ecological health of Whakaraupō (Lyttelton Harbour) – is already bringing about change after its launch in March. The plan is the result of a commitment between mana whenua and local governance bodies, and is a unique example of successful partnership and collaboration in environmental management.

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A Good Egg

There’s a party at the New Zealand Consul-General’s home in Los Angeles, and Rachel House is looking for people she knows. “Let’s hang out with those Māori over there,” she says. Since I can’t see who she’s talking about it’s not until I’m practically walking into Rena Owens, Keisha Castle-Hughes and Cliff Curtis that I appreciate the setup. “Kaua e whakamā,” she says with a smile, waving me forward for introductions.

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Ka taki mai te māuru
When the nor’wester howls

At the inaugural Māori Climate Forum in Wellington in 2003, formal recognition of traditional Māori understandings of weather and climate variability and change was made, with several Māori elders highlighting the importance of giving a greater account of this knowledge of the environment.

Building on these initial efforts, in January 2016 Te Kūwaha-o-Taihoro-Nukurangi was awarded research funding from the Vision Mātauranga government science programme, as part of the Deep South National Science Challenge. This funding enables the team to work closely with knowledge holders from Ngāi Tahu whānui to identify, revitalise, and promote the use of environmental indicators to forecast weather and climate extremes.

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