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Thoughts on te reo and the Green Party policy

The place of te reo was a hot topic this election. With the Green Party promising compulsion, Labour giving a watered-down version of the same thing, and National predictably shoehorning it in with other languages as an optional choice, it’s hard to see what will actually happen with the nation’s Indigenous language in terms of legislation.

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The Māori Party – what went wrong?

A lasting image from the 2017 general election was Te Ururoa Flavell’s open tears and heartbreak at losing Waiariki, knowing that loss spelt the end of the Māori Party. It was a shock for many, with genuine sorrow expressed across the political spectrum.

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A Tokyo Tale: to be continued

Japanese businessman and philanthropist Masashi Yamada has a special place in Ngāi Tahu history. It was his generous donation that enabled the iwi to complete negotiations for the Ngāi Tahu Settlement, and years later yet another contribution led to the establishment of the Ngāi Tahu Mātauranga Trust. This year, a delegation from the Yamada family visited Ōtautahi to meet with some of the beneficiaries of this trust.

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Connecting people, place and time

In September, a group of whānau and Department of Conservation (DOC) staff travelled to the secluded island of Whenua Hou off the north-west coast of Rakiura. They gathered to witness the unveiling of three pouwhenua carved by Ngāi Tahu artist James York and supported by the Ngāi Tahu Fund, erected to acknowledge and embody the special relationship Ngāi Tahu shares with the motu.

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One year on

It’s now 12 months since the seismic events that ripped apart Kaikōura and its surrounding communities, changing lives and landscapes forever. The town is slowly rebuilding, and the locals putting the pieces of their lives back together again.

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Understanding Relativity

Over the years while reading Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu annual reports, you might have come across the term “relativity” – a mechanism built into the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998 that has required the Crown to pay several million dollars to the iwi over and above the initial $170 million. Kaituhi Christopher Brankin explains the origins of the Relativity Mechanism, and unpacks the complexities of its function.

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Wahine Fashionista

Designer Amber Bridgman is the wahine behind KAHUWAI, a clothing line that explores identity and whakapapa through its unique Māori influence. Earlier this year, Amber shared her work with the world when she had the opportunity to participate in the Melbourne Fashion Festival. Alice Dimond spoke to Amber about her life, her work, and the designs that launched a successful career in the fashion industry.

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Kaumātua care
A Kaupapa Māori model

Our tribal philosophy, For us and our children after us, summarises the forward-looking perspective that sees the iwi focus on development for our tamariki, rangatahi, and young families; on creating opportunities that ensure that the future looks ever brighter for generations of Ngāi Tahu to come. But with an ageing population, there is also a growing need to ensure we support our kaumātua, the very people who have enabled our iwi to continue to thrive.

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Protecting our tītī

The Davis whānau of Murihiku are well-known as a staunch tītī whānau. Over the years they have poured time, energy, and resources into their taonga, determined to “walk the kaitiaki talk” by caring for their islands, and the many species that call (or have called) them home.
The measures they have taken to eradicate pest species are a crucial part of this.

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Quantification of Loss – negotiations with the Crown

Central to the tensions that arose during the course of the Ngāi Tahu negotiations was the question of how the total value of the settlement would be ascertained and dealt with. While the Crown approached the negotiations from the perspective that earlier settlements of the 1940s only required updating, negotiators for Ngāi Tahu believed that the amount returned to them had to reflect the value of what they had lost. Ngāi Tahu understood that full reimbursement would have been impossible, but they believed that some rationalisation or formula was necessary.

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