Our Stories


ASEAN delegation visits Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu

In April Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu hosted a delegation of 10 of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) most talented young diplomats on an inaugural ASEAN study tour. The delegates came from each of the 10 ASEAN countries – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. During their…

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Farm planting on target

    Despite the challenges of a harsh physical environment, Ngāi Tahu Farming is well on the way to achieving its goal of planting 1.5 million native plants across its Te Whenua Hou properties. Working in partnership the with Lincoln University Department of Ecology, Ngāi Tahu Farming is implementing a biodiversity plan drawn up by…

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Kia Kūrapa ki Kaikōura

I huihui mai nei ngā tāngata nō Te Tai o Marokura kia whai i te reo o ō tātou tīpuna. Four generations – kaumātua, pākeke, rakatahi and tamariki – took part in Kia Kūrapa ki Kaikōura over the weekend. Rāwiri Manawatu (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāti Kurī), with the support of Kotahi Mano Kāika, organised this…

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Whenua Hou

Ngāi Tahu carver James York (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Māmoe, Waitaha, Rapuwai) is carving pou to be erected on Whenua Hou to honour the unique connection of Ngāi Tahu with the island. Nā Kahu Te Whaiti. Whenua Hou, an island north-west of Rakiura, was an important stopping point for muttonbirders travelling to the Tītī islands. In…

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Ngā hau e whā
From the editor

This is it. My last issue as editor of TE KARAKA. Yes, that means an enormous sadness. It was a privilege to be called to the role as editor at the beginning of 2012. Former editor Faumuinā Tafuna’i was returning to her homeland of Samoa and I had been living in Auckland with my family. We were ready for the change and I was more than ready to work for the tribe.

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From the CEO

Along with global warming or climate change, it goes without saying that communities are becoming more culturally diverse. The world is a small place and people are more mobile than ever before. Some are forced to move due to political and survival needs, while others are free and equipped to make choices at their own will. Over the next 20 years we will see a growth in European, Māori, Asian, and Pacifica ethnicities. As political and iwi leaders, we should ensure our decision-making reflects this.

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Catching fish, not seabirds

When the opportunity came to install Australasia’s first seabird scaring device on the stern of Kawatea, his new state-of-the-art longliner, he didn’t hesitate. Not even at a price tag of $40,000.

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He Whakaaro
Resilience in a time of uncertainty

The theme of the hui (also known as COP 21) was promoting the recognition and respect of traditional knowledge in fighting against and adapting to climate change. There was agreement that bringing indigenous knowledge and indigenous people into decision-making and policy development in affected areas was key to confronting the crisis in the coming years.

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Ka hao te Rakatahi

Before I begin, I’ll admit that while I’m not 100 per cent either way, I do lean toward a flag change. Simply put, I believe the current flag is anachronistic, has little representation of any of New Zealand’s other races (mainly Māori), is far too similar to Australia’s, and is not the most attractive or stirring flag. I can also certainly see why many want to keep it.

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