Our Stories


Whenua Hou

Ngāi Tahu carver James York (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Māmoe, Waitaha, Rapuwai) is carving pou to be erected on Whenua Hou to honour the unique connection of Ngāi Tahu with the island. Nā Kahu Te Whaiti. Whenua Hou, an island north-west of Rakiura, was an important stopping point for muttonbirders travelling to the Tītī islands. In…

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Ngā hau e whā
From the editor

This is it. My last issue as editor of TE KARAKA. Yes, that means an enormous sadness. It was a privilege to be called to the role as editor at the beginning of 2012. Former editor Faumuinā Tafuna’i was returning to her homeland of Samoa and I had been living in Auckland with my family. We were ready for the change and I was more than ready to work for the tribe.

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From the CEO

Along with global warming or climate change, it goes without saying that communities are becoming more culturally diverse. The world is a small place and people are more mobile than ever before. Some are forced to move due to political and survival needs, while others are free and equipped to make choices at their own will. Over the next 20 years we will see a growth in European, Māori, Asian, and Pacifica ethnicities. As political and iwi leaders, we should ensure our decision-making reflects this.

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Catching fish, not seabirds

When the opportunity came to install Australasia’s first seabird scaring device on the stern of Kawatea, his new state-of-the-art longliner, he didn’t hesitate. Not even at a price tag of $40,000.

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He Whakaaro
Resilience in a time of uncertainty

The theme of the hui (also known as COP 21) was promoting the recognition and respect of traditional knowledge in fighting against and adapting to climate change. There was agreement that bringing indigenous knowledge and indigenous people into decision-making and policy development in affected areas was key to confronting the crisis in the coming years.

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Ka hao te Rakatahi

Before I begin, I’ll admit that while I’m not 100 per cent either way, I do lean toward a flag change. Simply put, I believe the current flag is anachronistic, has little representation of any of New Zealand’s other races (mainly Māori), is far too similar to Australia’s, and is not the most attractive or stirring flag. I can also certainly see why many want to keep it.

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Te Ao o te Māori
A window into the rich lifestyles of contemporary māori

In May 2014, working as a cleaner in the Re:START container mall, Amy noticed the homeless people in and around the city. She reached out and offered help to a few individuals, and soon discovered a huge need by people doing it tough on the streets, laid off from jobs, living in over-crowded houses, or just struggling to make ends meet.

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Environmental watchdogs

Edward Ellison says there is no question the Ngāi Tahu voice has been heard loud and clear by the authorities, and by the chemical companies themselves. He is confident the applicants know what is required of them to meet the expectations of tangata whenua in future.

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Te Rangitaki a Te Ranui
Eat noodles, find husband…

Within a few days of writing this, I will be in Shanghai, the modern Chinese city that is home to more than 24 million people. The city has about 35 universities, with studies ranging across almost every discipline imaginable. I will be attending Fudan University, ranked in the top 10 of all Chinese institutions. Fudan has four campuses and more than 31,000 students.

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