Our Stories


He Aitaka a Tāne
Tussocks offer unlikely shelter in a storm

Before human settlement of Aotearoa, the dominant cover of higher alpine grasslands was large snow tussocks of the Chionochloa family. At lower altitudes, sub-alpine grasslands were primarily dominated by short or low tussocks (less than 50 cm), including a taonga species for Ngāi Tahu – silver tussock (Poa cita) – and hard tussock (Festuca novae-zelandiae).

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Reviews
Books

There’s a chapter for every object, written by historians, archivists, curators, and Māori scholars. They look into the “lives” of treasured family possessions such as family diaries, a cherished kahu kiwi, a music album, Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki, a stamp collection, and of course, those fabulous tāniko slippers.

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Waka Legend

Hekenukumai Busby is credited with reviving waka building and celestial navigation in Aotearoa. His waka have sailed between New Zealand, Hawaii, and many islands in the Pacific and he has made at least 30 waka, including several waka hourua (double hulled sailing waka).Understandably, kaituhi Jeff Evans was a little nervous when he first began talking…

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He Tangata
Matt Scobie

Matt Scobie is a PhD candidate who begins study at the University of Sheffield this month. His research will explore ways to hold business and government accountable for their wider social and environmental impacts with a focus on engagement around the operations of extractive industries in areas of importance to indigenous groups. He completed a Master of Commerce at the University of Canterbury.

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Intergenerational Approach continues to deliver results for iwi

A long-term approach to investment continues to pay off for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu posting a year-end net profit of $109.36m (post distribution activities) for the 2015 financial year. “Strong financial results provide the platform we need to create and deliver life enhancing initiatives that will enable our people to reach their full potential…

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Exploring Ngāi Tahu birthing traditions

University of Canterbury PhD student, Kelly Tikao will present a wānanga on her journey to date looking at traditional Māori birthing practices at Hui-ā-Iwi in Dunedin in November. Kelly (Ngāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe, Waitaha) was this year’s recipient of both the Health Research Council PhD Māori Scholarship and the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre UC Māori…

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Studying journalism abroad

Tahu Stanley is one of four University of Canterbury honours students who have been selected to study journalism in Finland or Denmark next year as part of the Inclusive Journalism Initiative. The initiative is a joint-venture between four key national and international education institutions that offer studies in journalism – University of Canterbury, Auckland University…

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Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu road show – Brisbane

Kia ora e te whānau, Check out the video and some photos from our Ngāi Tahu Road Show in Brisbane, Sunday 27 September. It was a great opportunity to engage, meet and share stories with our whānau living in Australia.

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Staying at Nohoanga

Nohoanga provides all Ngāi Tahu with an opportunity to experience the landscape as their tīpuna did, and to rekindle the traditional practices of gathering food and other natural resources. The term ‘nohoanga’ (literally meaning a place to sit) traditionally refers to the seasonal occupation sites which were an integral part of the mobile lifestyle of…

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Settlement Photo Gallery

This week we celebrate the 17th anniversary of the enactment of the Ngāi Tahu Settlement Bill. This occurred on 1 October 1998, the day the Bill was signed by the Governor General to become an Act of the New Zealand Parliament (Date of assent). This gallery of photographs shows the various stages of the settlement…

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