Our Stories


Manawa Kāi Tahu
Waiata mō Huirapa

Following the incident with Tūtekohi the descendants of Rakawahakura moved further south and settled in the Hawke’s Bay area. His granddaughter, Tūhaitara, married Marukore who belonged to the local tangata whenua, a little-known iwi called Te Kāhea. They had 11 children, many of whom are founding ancestors of senior Ngāi Tahu hapū.

Read More

Kai
Reviving the old ways

Spend time in the cookhouse and you will learn not just about mahinga kai, but also about your whakapapa. Karl Russell shares early memories of Arowhenua and his future ambition to develop modern kai karts.

Read More

Hei Mahi Māra
Māra kai aroaromahana 2012

Spring is my favorite time of year. As a gardener, I get to be outside in the sunshine and participate in the kaitiakitanga of ushering in the miracle of life as tiny seeds and seedlings start their new cycle in the whenua.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Riverbeds as well as water rights

Ownership of the beds of rivers is important because that is where dams and other water control structures are located. Whoever owns the river bed can control access to it to maintain those structures and to build new ones.

Read More

Reviews

A Savage Country: The Untold Story of New Zealand in the 1820s and more

Read More

Ngā Take Pūtea
Outside the box, into a new home

“You WHAT?” This was the reaction when 20-year-old Ondine Grace told her friends that she was buying her first whare. Even more shocking for some of her friends, who had see-money-and-spend-it tendencies, was that Ondine had saved $22,000.

Read More

Understanding Aoraki

Aoraki Bound alumni reach new heights.
From a distance Aoraki is a quiet stunning vista. Close up, the sound of avalanches rumble through the valley, and sightseeing helicopters and planes fly above. And as you get closer, the ridges of Aoraki get steeper and his boulders get bigger.

Read More