Our Stories

From the CEO

This month Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu celebrates 17 years since settlement with the Crown. The governance approach over those years was to go hard on asset wealth creation, and today the tribe is financially anchored. The set-up of a new 18-member tribal council came with its teething problems, and like any new group there would be colourful moments along the way.

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Whenua – Hikuraki and Manawapōre

The wetlands of Hikuraki and Manawapōre (the Mavora Lakes) lie within the impressive geographical and ancestral landscape of the Whakatipu Wai-Māori (Lake Whakatipu) region. Surrounded by maunga, bush, and tussock grassland, the lakes were part of an important traditional travel route from Murihiku to the head of Whakatipu Wai-Māori and thence, the famed pounamu source, Te Koroka.

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Kaumātua Kapa Haka festival

Two Ngāi Tahu kaumātua kapa haka, from Tuahiwi and Murihiku, supported by the Ngāi Tahu Fund, joined 10 kapa with about 300 performers aged between 50 and 98 at the New Zealand Post Kaumātua Kapa Haka at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Since 8am, Makere Kupenga and Sharlene Waata-Pirikahu and have been working in the kitchen at Te Pā o Rākaihautū, preparing kai for its 140 students and 21 staff. Chicken drumsticks on rice with two salads to choose from, and a carton of chilled milk, or water. Te Pā o Rākaihautū is a newly established special character Yr 1 -13 state school, based in Ōtautahi, that caters for the whole whānau from early childhood through to tertiary on one site.

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Land bill courts controversy

In the years since the Treaty of Waitangi, land that has remained or has returned to Māori ownership has been guarded and used as a place to endure, sustain whānau, and continue the traditions of our tīpuna. In the last 150 years around 200 laws and amendments that impact on the management of Māori land have been enacted. Whānau have had to navigate this ever-changing environment over that period.

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Kā Manukura O Te Reo
A Force of Nature

“The only way our language will survive is by normalising it in everyday life. If you won’t let me speak to you in Māori in the supermarket, you are never going to normalise it, and when your kids want to learn Māori, they are going to have to learn from me because you can’t and I don’t have time for that.”

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A Happy Investment

I still recall the middle-aged American’s line, a half-joke thrown into the wind as our boat flew down the Shotover Gorge at 85 kilometres an hour. “I think,” he said, “I just wet my pants.” I remember vividly, too, our driver, an ice-cool Slavic type in a black roll-neck and leather driving gloves, whose insouciant demeanour spoke of either competence or recklessness, depending on how you felt about being driven within centimetres of the canyon rocks.

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Fortune favours the brave

Kimi Ākau (the Shotover River) holds a special place in the hearts of the Ellison whānau, thanks to the courage of one of their tupuna, who virtually made his fortune on this wild high country river in a single day.

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He Koha – He Ngākau Aroha

Kataore was one of six groups representing the Te Arawa region at Te Matatini 2015. Their whakawātea (exit) – one of the many connections of Ngāti Pikiao to Ngāi Tahu – talked about the master carvers who traveled to Christchurch to help carve Ārai-te-uru Pā, the pā built in Hagley Park for the New Zealand International Exhibition 1906/07.

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Media

Hurunui/Kaikōura Earthquake legislation

The Government today introduced the Hurunui/Kaikōura Earthquakes Emergency Relief Bill and the Civil Defence Emergency Management Amendment Act 2016 Amendment Bill to Parliament. The Government has also indicated a third Bill, the Hurunui/Kaikoura Earthquake Recovery Bill, will be introduced to the House on Thursday. Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu welcomes the introduction of these Bills…

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Whakaraupō initiative

A new initiative to restore the health of Lyttelton Harbour/Whakaraupō was launched today. The initiative will see five major players in the management of Whakaraupō/ Lyttelton Harbour – Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Environment Canterbury, Christchurch City Council, and the Lyttelton Port Company – join forces to create an action…

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