Our Stories

From the Editor

This is my first issue as editor of TE KARAKA. Am I a little nervous? Of course. The phrase ‘big boots to fill’ doesn’t seem quite the right metaphor to describe the challenge set by my predecessor, Faumuinā Tafuna’i, but as editor of TE KARAKA, she set a high standard.

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From the CEO

For Te Rūnanga it feels like we are in good shape to discuss the significant issues confronting the iwi and the nation. Our governance initiatives of the past year mean we are ready for some robust good high-level strategic debates. And there are plenty of debates to be had.

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He Kōrerorero
Surviving vs Living vs Thriving

I am a locavore, an eater of fresh food from my regions.

Of course I eat other things – I’ve got free-range chook and vegetables in the deep freeze because there aren’t any local producers of chook or peas or carrots or corn let alone the more exotic vege mixes in Big O. And I do have at least a bucket (sometimes a pōhā) of birds around for winter.

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Manawa Kāi Tahu
Ko Te Waiata a Paikea mō Ruatapu

Paikea is a renowned ancestor with particular importance to iwi who can trace their descent from the east coast of the North Island. Ngāti Porou have perhaps the greatest claim to the Paikea traditions, but certainly Ngāti Kahungunu and Kāi Tahu also recognise Paikea as an ancestor of great significance.

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Kai
Bevan Kaan

Bevan (Ngāi Tahu) is the middle son of Yvonne and the late Don Kaan from Ōtākou. He was brought up in Dunedin and studied macrobiotics in Switzerland, before opening a restaurant back in Dunedin. He then moved to Auckland, opened another restaurant, and developed a reputation as one of the city’s most respected macrobiotic chefs and teachers.

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Toi Iho
Honouring Te Aue Davis

“So what are YOU going to do about that?” It is a simple sentence and it used to freeze former Minister of Māori Affairs Koro Tainui Wētere in his tracks. Tā Tipene O’Regan (Ngāi Tahu) laughs as he remembers weaver and historian Te Aue Davis remonstrating with her cousin for some breach of Māori tradition.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Return of the worms

The summer gardening season has been kind to us this year in the Shaky City, with cooler-than-normal temperatures and occasional rain helping stave off the need for the city council to impose a total water ban (so far).

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Silence of the beech

Beech forests are widespread over much of Aotearoa. They straddle the spine of the mountain ranges of both islands, from the volcanic plateau of Te Ika a Māui to the southern coasts and ranges of Murihiku.

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Media

Hurunui/Kaikōura Earthquake legislation

The Government today introduced the Hurunui/Kaikōura Earthquakes Emergency Relief Bill and the Civil Defence Emergency Management Amendment Act 2016 Amendment Bill to Parliament. The Government has also indicated a third Bill, the Hurunui/Kaikoura Earthquake Recovery Bill, will be introduced to the House on Thursday. Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu welcomes the introduction of these Bills…

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Whakaraupō initiative

A new initiative to restore the health of Lyttelton Harbour/Whakaraupō was launched today. The initiative will see five major players in the management of Whakaraupō/ Lyttelton Harbour – Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Environment Canterbury, Christchurch City Council, and the Lyttelton Port Company – join forces to create an action…

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