Adrienne Anderson


Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

This year marks 20 years since the signing of the Deed of Settlement, a defining moment in a journey of over 150 years, which brought an end to the pain and struggle of a grieving people. And with this closure came a new beginning, with $170m plus add-ons in the bank and a newly formed organisational structure to manage the settlement. However, in celebrating this milestone, it is important to reflect on where this last part of the journey began – the lodgement of the claim some 11 years earlier.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

“Cultural connection” or “connectedness” are terms used with increasing frequency, but what do they really mean? The reality is that cultural connectedness means something different for everyone, and most largely relates to one’s life experiences. In a Ngāi Tahu context, does being culturally connected mean living in the takiwā and being actively involved in the local activities of the iwi, or can one have a meaningful connection living in the North Island or further afield? With more than 50 per cent of the iwi living outside of the takiwā, this is an interesting consideration.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In this issue we take the opportunity to acknowledge Tā Mark Solomon on his 18 years as Kaiwhakahaere o Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu. We reflect upon his contribution to Ngāi Tahu, to Māoridom, and in fact to the whole of Aotearoa.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

On flicking through the pages of this issue for the first time, what initially struck me was the important and varied role marae continue to play for whānau and their local communities – the beating heart. Nowhere has this been more apparent in recent times than Takahanga Marae in Kaikōura – the extraordinary effort of…

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of attending a weaving wānanga at Awarua Marae. From the moment I arrived I was struck by the overwhelming sense of whanaungatanga and community among this group of wāhine who have been coming together monthly for the past year-and-a-half to learn the art of weaving korowai.

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