Māori rock art


Warming the Nohoaka Toi

In early September a group of Ngāi Tahu artists came together to occupy Toi Moroki Centre of Contemporary Art (CoCA) in Ōtautahi and create the first major group showing of contemporary Ngāi Tahu art in 14 years. By creating an exhibition based on the principles of a nohoaka, the Paemanu Ngāi Tahu Contemporary Visual Arts…

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Recording rock art

Since the South Island Māori Rock Art Project began surveying and recording in 1990, over 600 Māori rock art sites have been mapped and photographed; of those, 300 were new and had not been recorded previously. Te Ana Ngāi Tahu Rock Art Trust curator, Amanda Symon says the survey team has been steadily finding many…

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Guardians of the future

The Te Ana Ngāi Tahu Rock Art Centre is placing a stronger focus on the education sector in the hope of raising the profile of ancient rock art and encouraging a new generation of rock art guardians. In 2014, 3,420 school children from 33 schools took part in Te Ana activities and Te Ana Ngāi…

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Canterbury rock art recognised

Renowned French archaeologist and cave art authority, Professor Jean Clottes, is keen to put Māori rock art on the international stage and create international opportunities for a young Ngāi Tahu researcher. Professor Clottes, who works as a rock art expert for UNESCO, spent two weeks visiting Māori rock art sites in both the North and…

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