NIWA


Understanding Kanakana

While many people recognise kanakana as a taonga species, little is actually known about them including their spawning and migration habits. Senior Environmental Advisor, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi, Dr Jane Kitson, says kanakana are very secretive creatures. “Kanakana have been around since before the dinosaur – with fossil records from 450 million years ago –…

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Wave barrier at Te Waihora a first of its kind

A 100m long wave barrier on the south western side of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere has been placed to enable submerged plants, known as macrophytes, to become established. NIWA freshwater ecologist Mary de Winton believed the barrier to be the first of its kind in the world for this purpose. “This barrier idea was conceived by…

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Symposium highlights Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere

The fifth Te Waihora Living Lake Symposium at Lincoln University will give participants the opportunity to learn much more about the science and work programmes currently underway to improve the health of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere. The 2015 symposium – Realising the Vision – the mountains to the sea ki uta ki tai – is organised…

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Officials impressed by partnership progress

A visit to the Selwyn-Waihora Catchment in early March, has given Government officials a first-hand view of the water conservation work being carried out by Ngāi Tahu and Environment Canterbury. Environment Canterbury’s Director of Resource Management and Whakaora Te Waihora Joint Officials and Steering Group member, Kim Drummond, stressed the importance of the visit. “It’s…

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Breaking new ground

When the massive beds of naturally-occurring macrophytes disappeared from Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere in the 1960s, it was a turning point for the quality of the lake’s water. Known for their ability to buffer wave action, to take up nutrients, to improve water quality and to provide diverse habitats for fish and wildlife, submerged macrophyte systems…

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Science fair success

Congratulations to Whai Rawa member Whakaahurangi Gallagher, who won two awards at the NIWA Wellington Regional Science and Technology Fair in August. Whakaahurangi is the daughter of Quinessa Sullivan (Ōnuku) and Timoti Gallagher (Rāpaki, Hokonui, Waihōpai, Awarua, Wairewa, Puketeraki, Ōnuku, Waihao, Ngāi Tūāhuriri, Arowhenua, Koukourārata). The 12-year-old accepted the Toihuarewa Award from Victoria University in…

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