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Posts Tagged ‘Phil Tumataroa’

Te Ao o te Māori

Jade, with the support of Ōraka Aparima Rūnaka has taken over the marae gardens and nursery area and plans to establish a native nursery which he hopes will be the first step in an ambitious plan to reintroduce areas of native bush to parts of Murihiku.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Taare Wetere Te Kāhu Stuart Home (Ngāi Tahu – Kāti Huirapa), or Wez, as he is better known, has grown up in and around the Waitaki district. As a kid living in Ōamaru he would often join whānau on trips up the Waitaki River to trap and transfer eels during the whakaheke – time of migration.

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Te Ao o te Māori

For more than 80 years the Te Waipounamu Māori Girls’ College helped young girls grow to become young women. Recently a small group of former Te Wai girls came together at the old Ferry Road school site in Christchurch to reminisce and help celebrate a significant birthday for former college Matron Reihana Parata; aka Aunty Doe or just “Mum” for the old girls of Te Wai

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Te Ao o te Māori

Motoring up the shipping channel of the Whangārei Harbour, Hayden Smith suddenly slows the Sea Cleaners boat and arcs it hard right. He’s spotted something in the water. It’s a piece of plastic, which he expertly manoeuvres towards before grabbing a net to scoop it from the ocean. He’s done this a thousand times before – it’s what feeds him, drives him, and helps to give his life purpose.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Rex Anglem loves getting out of bed and going to work.
“I don’t know what I’ll do when I retire. To be honest I’ll retire when I’ve got a wooden suit on me,” he says with a chuckle.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Tiaki has a wry smile as he reflects on the journey that has led him away from Te Waipounamu to the rugged Raglan west coast, where he has lived for the past four years with partner Madi Watson and their two-year-old son, Tāwhai.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Korey Gibson (Ngāti Huia, Ngāti Tama, Ngāi Tahu) says he’s not the type of person to sit on his hands. Today not sitting on his hands means being in the boxing ring for an early morning workout, story time with his 18-month-old daughter Waitohi, singing waiata with partner Tessa Murray, and time with his beloved pig dogs before heading to the office.

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Ngā hau e whā
From the managing editor

Returning to ancestral land can be a therapeutic process. That profound sense of connection and belonging that comes with communing with whenua that carries the footsteps of our ancestors.

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Te Ao o te Māori
A window into the rich lifestyles of contemporary māori

In May 2014, working as a cleaner in the Re:START container mall, Amy noticed the homeless people in and around the city. She reached out and offered help to a few individuals, and soon discovered a huge need by people doing it tough on the streets, laid off from jobs, living in over-crowded houses, or just struggling to make ends meet.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Since 8am, Makere Kupenga and Sharlene Waata-Pirikahu and have been working in the kitchen at Te Pā o Rākaihautū, preparing kai for its 140 students and 21 staff. Chicken drumsticks on rice with two salads to choose from, and a carton of chilled milk, or water. Te Pā o Rākaihautū is a newly established special character Yr 1 -13 state school, based in Ōtautahi, that caters for the whole whānau from early childhood through to tertiary on one site.

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