Ranui Ngarimu


Walking the talk

Tā Mark Solomon is not the kind of man who speaks at length about himself. He values his privacy and he’s prone to under-playing any suggestion that he’s made a significant contribution to Māoridom, to Ngāi Tahu.
The fact that he was knighted in 2013 in recognition of the work he has done for Ngāi Tahu and for Māoridom is a case in point. His initial reaction was to baulk at the honour, but there were those who told him to “pull his head in,” that it wasn’t just for him, it was for the tribe. He relates how he was told firmly to “get up there to Wellington and receive the honour on behalf of the tribe.”

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Ngāi Tahu welcome HRH Prince Harry at Invercargill Airport

A delegation from Ngāi Tahu welcomed HRH Prince Harry at Invercargill Airport. Tā Mark Solomon, Te Rūnanga o Ngai Tahu Kaiwhakahaere and Tā Tipene O’Regan, Upoko (traditional leader) Awarua Rūnanga and representatives of Waihopai Rūnanga greeted the Prince who is making his first visit to Murihiku (Southland) before heading to Rakiura (Stewart Island). “It was…

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The art of weaving

The first arrivals in Aotearoa found a climate much cooler than the one they had left behind in Te Ao Tawhito, or the old world. The new arrivals needed to adapt and create clothes and tools from the new plants they found here.

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Telling the stories

Roger Fyfe is passionate about taonga and as the senior curator of Anthropology at Canterbury Museum, he’s relieved that Māori treasures in the museum collections have fared well, despite many months of earthquakes and aftershocks. Of the 15,000 items on display in the museum at the time of the February 22nd quake, only 180 were…

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Homecoming

Once upon a time there was a sea captain who sailed to the bottom of the world in search of adventure and good fortune. He conquered treacherous seas to eventually make landfall on a remote but beautiful place on the southern coastline of Te Wai Pounamu.

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A sense of pride

Ngāi Tahu language leaders were recognised at a glittering awards ceremony at Ōtākou Marae that also honoured te reo heroes of the past. In his opening speech, Tā Tipene O’Regan told the audience that the rebirth of Ngāi Tahu reo was in good hands. He said while previously the tribe had been consumed with the Claim, it was time to move on and promote revitalisation of Ngāi Tahu reo.

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16th
January
2013

Ngāi Tahu unveil a pouwhenua, carved sign and tukutuku panels in Antarctica

A pouwhenua, carved Scott Base sign and tukutuku panels created by Ngāi Tahu artists will be unveiled at Scott Base on Sunday 20 January. Prime Minister John Key, Ngāi Tahu Kaiwhakahaere Tā Mark Solomon, and master weaver Ranui Ngarimu will take part in the special ceremony. Geographically, Ngāi Tahu is the closest iwi to Antarctica….


27th
February
2012

Prestigious Kapa Haka festival to be held in Christchurch in 2015

27 February, 2012 The biannual Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival, where elite kapa haka performers from around New Zealand and Australia come together to compete, will be held in Christchurch in 2015. Christchurch won its bid to host this prestigious cultural event after the Waitaha Cultural Council supported by representatives from the Christchurch City…


23rd
June
2010

Inaugural Ngāi Tahu Reo Māori Awards 2010

23 June 2010 Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu is holding its first ever Ngāi Tahu Reo Māori Awards at Ngā Hau E Whā Marae on Thursday, 24th June as part of its 10-year Kotahi Mano Kaika, Kotahi Mano Wawata (KMK) celebrations. The awards hosted by Stacey Morrison and Ross Painiora are to honour the achievements…