Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu


The Right Stone

Mauri Tau Mauri Ora is the 270 kilogram pounamu kōhatu that sits on a Carrara marble plinth at the entrance to Oi Manawa, the Canterbury Earthquake National Memorial. Gifted by Te Rūnanga o Makaawhio, it marks a place for those affected by the Christchurch earthquakes to reflect and remember the people and places they have lost. It signposts a memorial to whenua, whānau, and memories.
For carver Fayne Robinson (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāti Māhaki, Ngāti Waewae; Ngāti Apa ki te Ra To – Puahaterangi), it is also a metaphor of sorts for the before and after of Christchurch city. Its rough crust, he says, resembles rubble; and the “little windows of potential”, showing in places, reflect where we are heading with the city rebuild.

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Uncle Charlie
A Man for his People

It is unlikely that you can have a discussion about the Ngāi Tahu Settlement without hearing stories about Charles Crofts (Ngāti Huakai, Ngāi Tūāhuriri), or as most of the iwi know him, Uncle Charlie. As Charlie tells it, it was the “luck of the draw” that he was Kaiwhakahaere of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu at the time of settlement. However, as we speak in the home he shares with his wife Meri, eating mousetraps and sipping on tea, it becomes clear that there was more than just luck at play. Charlie is a man who was always going to do great things.

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Te Pōkai Tara o te Ao

Ten Ngāi Tahu taiohi or rangatahi, preparing for the trip of a lifetime to Silicon Valley to hopefully become part of the next generation of Māori innovators, scientists, and entrepreneurs.

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Marae manaaki

When a massive magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck North Canterbury just after midnight on November 14, Takahanga Marae in Kaikōura opened its doors to distraught locals and visitors with characteristic manaaki, promptly setting itself up as a welfare centre for the community.
This was the third largest earthquake in New Zealand in a century and it took the lives of two people. It wasn’t only the marae that showed whanaungatanga to Kaikōura – within hours Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu staff also set out to help whānau in need.

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Indigenising the Corporation

Ngāi Tahu are seen as the ultimate post-settlement success story, but how much of that success is tied to our “corporate structure” and being the “good Māori?” In the eyes of most New Zealanders, our success comes from things we have borrowed from others, rather than from what makes us unique.

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Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Road Shows 2016

Nau mai tauti mai whānau, This year the Road Shows format has evolved. There will be opportunities for whānau to find out more information about accessing Ngāi Tahu Funds, registering with the Whakapapa Unit and signing up for Whai Rawa. Our teams will have stalls there to assist and answer any questions whānau may have…

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History never repeats

As the first chief executive of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Sid Ashton was the man credited for the solid foundations which have stood the iwi in good stead.

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Kā Manukura O Te Reo
A Force of Nature

“The only way our language will survive is by normalising it in everyday life. If you won’t let me speak to you in Māori in the supermarket, you are never going to normalise it, and when your kids want to learn Māori, they are going to have to learn from me because you can’t and I don’t have time for that.”

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The Waitaha groups

EPISODE TWO – THE WAITAHA GROUPS In this episode we talk with the three qualifying Waitaha groups, Ngā Manu a Tāne, Te Ahikōmau a Hamoterangi and Te Pao a Tahu, who will represent the region at Te Matatini 2015. Each group will share the origins and the kaupapa matua of their groups and the vibe…

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Stanford MBA students visit

Students from the number one-rated MBA school in the US dropped by Te Runanga o Ngāi Tahu the other day for some kai and a korero. The students from Stanford University’s MBA programme were here thanks to a link established by Kaiwhakahaere Tā Mark Solomon.

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