Whenua


Whenua

Te Hakapupu Te Hakapupu (Pleasant River) rises in the hilly forested country before flowing in a generally eastward direction entering the Otago coastline between Matakaea (Shag Point) and the Waikouaiti River. The prevalent estuary situated at the river mouth has historically been a rich source of mahinga kai with extensive Māori archaeological sites situated nearby.

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Whenua

The Waimakariri is one of the largest rivers in North Canterbury. Flowing in a generally south-eastward direction from Kā Tiritiri o Te Moana (Southern Alps), the name Waimakariri refers to the makariri (cold) mountain-fed waters.

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Whenua

Manuhaea was traditionally a kāinga mahinga kai (food-gathering settlement) and kāinga nohoanga (settlement) on the eastern side of “the Neck” – the narrow isthmus of land separating lakes Hāwea and Wānaka.

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Whenua

The Rakahuri (Ashley River) is one of the numerous rivers that flow into Te Tai o Maahunui (Pegasus Bay). The river and its associated tributaries, wetlands, and lagoons were traditionally well known for their mahinga kai values.

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Whenua

Tūtakahikura is the beach immediately south of the old kaik on the Moeraki peninsula. In the late 19th century it was home to one of the largest Ngāi Tahu settlements on the east coast of Te Waipounamu.

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Whenua
Kaitorete Spit

Kaitorete is the wide shingle spit that separates the waters of Te Waihora from the sea. Extending from the foot of Te Pātaka o Rakaihautu at Wairewa in the north to Taumutu in the south, it was part of a key travel route for Ngāi Tahu travelling along Kā Poupou a Rakihouia (the Canterbury seaboard).

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Whenua – Hikuraki and Manawapōre

The wetlands of Hikuraki and Manawapōre (the Mavora Lakes) lie within the impressive geographical and ancestral landscape of the Whakatipu Wai-Māori (Lake Whakatipu) region. Surrounded by maunga, bush, and tussock grassland, the lakes were part of an important traditional travel route from Murihiku to the head of Whakatipu Wai-Māori and thence, the famed pounamu source, Te Koroka.

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Whenua – Pareāihe

Pareāihe – The extensive volcanic peninsula that juts out from the east coast of Te Waipounamu, southeast of Ōtautahi, has been referred to by successive generations of Māori as “Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū”, meaning “the great food store house of Rākaihautū”.

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Whenua – Te Au Nui (Mataura Falls)

Te Au Nui (Mataura Falls) on the Mataura River is traditionally renowned for its abundance of kanakana (lampreys). This important mahinga kai has survived against the odds. In the late 19th century it was drastically altered when the Mataura Paper Mill and the Mataura Freezing Works were established on opposite sides of the river. Fifteen metres…

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Whenua – Ōmakō

Ōmakō is one of the Ngāi Tahu names for the Lindis Pass area. The name denotes both the pass and the river. This dramatic and iconic landscape which links Te Manahuna (Mackenzie Basin) with the lakes of Central Otago was part of an important ara tawhito extending from the Waitaki river mouth to Lake Hawea….

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