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Posts by: Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu

Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

When TE KARAKA first landed in letter boxes in the mid-1990s, Ngāi Tahu was in the midst of Te Kerēme. The magazine played a pivotal role in ensuring whānau not only kept up-to-date about this very complex and critical process, but were also able to gain an insight and understanding into the history of how it came to be. Throughout the years TE KARAKA has continued to evolve. In every issue we are privileged to share the rich and diverse stories that celebrate what it means to be Ngāi Tahu. These stories help connect whānau with their whakapapa, their whenua and with each other.

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From the CEO
A walk down memory lane

For the past nine years I have brought this column to you in a way that has reflected the day-to-day reality of my multigenerational whare in Tuahiwi. Recently we bid farewell to our dearly loved father, William Ruwhiu QSM, who was the centre and life-force of our whānau. With his effervescent personality he would begin each day with “mōrena” and when I would ask “how are you today”, his cheeky reply would be: “Well, I’m still alive.” Dad was a quick-witted social character who easily brought humour to any situation. It was easy to see how he could build rapport with anyone as he made you feel like you were a star no matter who you were.

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Whenua
Mātakitaki

MĀTAKITAKI is the correct spelling for the Matukituki River, which flows from Kā Tiritiri-o-te-moana (the Southern Alps) into the west side of Lake Wānaka.

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Ka hao te Rakatahi
The spaces we will fill

We are two young wāhine who have grown up often being called on to be the “rangatahi Māori advisors” in the many spaces we find ourselves in. There is seemingly a rising need for a rangatahi perspective. To have our voices heard has been validating, especially at a young age, and the experience that we have gained due to being a part of those conversations has been invaluable. This is not to say we have not experienced times where we have been asked to take a seat at a table so the Māori box could be ticked, or the rangatahi or wahine box.

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He Whakaaro
Do you have to be a racist to do racist things?

When I think of the future I want for my mokopuna, I imagine one free of racism, prejudice and the barriers that have kept us in the headlines of all the bad statistics and rarely in the good ones. Whether it is Judith Collins playing the racial division card to get votes, Tauranga Ratepayers Alliance’s booing of a mihi, or the online rants of keyboard warriors like Eagle Brewery’s David Gaughan, it’s clear we still have work to do in Aotearoa. A big part of the challenge is that most people don’t see themselves as racist despite exhibiting racist behaviour.

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Kia kuru pounamu te rongo – Treasuring our mokopuna

It’s leading the way in making mātauraka māori the rule, not the exception with a clear vision of ensuring Aotearoa is a place where all mokopuna can thrive. Independent from the Government, it advocates for the interests, rights and wellbeing of children and young people, while also serving as a watchdog of sorts – monitoring spaces where young people are detained, from care to youth justice residences. While 2021 has seen a slew of changes announced within the public sector that signal a deeper commitment to embracing Māori, for Māori models – the announcement of a Māori health authority, for instance – the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) has long been a vocal, and visible, proponent of fully realising the intention of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

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Freshwater – rangatiratanga versus ownership

When Wiremu Potiki stood before the Smith-Nairn Royal Commission in 1880 he made it clear he had claimed Te Aunui waterfall twice when accompanying Walter Mantell in his negotiations with the Crown for Murihiku in 1851.

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Mana whenua rising – Tui, tuia…

Pūrākau and whakapapa. embedded in the landscape, brought to life once more with transmission through whakairo and mahi toi in ways to fit our modern context. The large-scale artworks standing sentinel along the coastline from from Ōaro to Matariki/Clarence serve as a clear reminder of the history, presence and permanency of mana whenua.

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Fighting the good fight in the face of adversity

Blair Vining’s Epic Journey became a leading voice for equitable cancer care throughout Aotearoa, as he fought for an end to the ‘postcode lottery’ that sees many in the deep south face a long wait to access specialist care and treatment. His wife, Melissa Vining (Kāi Tahu – Ōraka-Aparima), has carried on his battle to save the lives of those living throughout Murihiku and Ōtākou.

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Whai Rawa
15 years on

KiwiSaver launched to much fanfare in 2007 with the promise of setting New Zealanders up for retirement or helping them get on the property ladder. But before KiwiSaver there was Whai Rawa, the investment scheme launched by Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu the previous year. As the iwi investment scheme celebrates its 15th birthday, we look back at the journey that has seen the scheme grow to 30,000 members, with over $112 million invested.

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