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Posts by: Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu

Ngā Hau e Whā – From the Editor

Our cover story mā te wāhine, mā te whenua – ka ora ai te tangata provides a glimpse into our next-gen leadership. Cousins Jaleesa Panirau and Kelly Barry are conquering new frontiers as young wāhine in leadership roles for their Wairewa Rūnanga – Jaleesa as Chair and Kelly as General Manager. Their passion, vision and tenacity is to be applauded. You can read their story here.

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He Whakaaro

Research tells us skills are the currency of the future. Unlike technical skills that are mostly taught through formal qualifications, it is the interpersonal or human skills we gain through life and work experience that are increasingly in demand.

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From the CEO
Making a difference

I’m not blowing our trumpet. The thing is, as stewards we have a duty, and it is a no-brainer that if whānau can drive their own goals and come up with their own solutions, then their strength and confidence will have a cascading effect. After all, isn’t this what we strive for in our own homes?

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Ka Hao te Rakatahi

Creativity, innovation and governance are areas I’ve always been passionate about. From being enriched in STEM as part of the first Te Pōkai Ao rōpū in 2016, strategising as part of the working party for Rautaki Rakatahi 2018-19, innovating in my Young Enterprise Scheme business, developing a polystyrene alternative inspired by pōhā, to my roles as youth trustee on the Young Enterprise Trust Board and youth rep on the Hastings District Council District Development subcommittee.

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Whare Taonga

This state-of-the-art facility is a symbol of the strong relationship that has developed between Te Rūnanga o Kaikōura and Crown agencies in the wake of the devastating earthquake in 2016. More importantly, it provides a home for the many taonga and artefacts discovered during the recovery and rebuild, safe in the guardianship of manawhenua.

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Whenua

Upokororo (the Eglinton River) flows from Ōtapara (Lake Gunn) in a generally southern direction before entering Te Ana-au (Lake Te Anau). Upokororo is the Māori name for the now extinct New Zealand grayling (Prototroctes oxyrhynchus). The young of this slender, silvery smelt were once common in lowland freshwater rivers and streams, and grew to maturity in saltwater. The Upokororo River was part of the traditional travel route that provided access between Te Ana-au and Piopiotahi (Milford Sound).

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Farewelling Her Majesty

When Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II died on 9 September, it drew to a close a reign of more than 70 years over the United Kingdom and Commonwealth – including Aotearoa. She was a symbol of quiet constancy and stability in an ever-changing world, and Tā Tipene O’Regan was honoured to join the New Zealand delegation that travelled to London to attend her funeral. He sits down with kaituhi Anna Brankin to reflect on the funeral and the significant role the monarchy has played in our country, and for our iwi.

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Aukaha

For Moewai Rauputi Marsh, the importance of connectivity with others, with the whenua, and with her whakapapa is what drives her in the creation of her art. Kaituhi Hannah Kerr caught up with her to discuss her art journey and her goals.

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Empowering whānau in business

It has been a challenging few years for the tourism industry, but now that borders are re-opening and there are less restrictions in place, businesses are excited and ready to welcome manuhiri back to our beautiful motu.

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