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Tuna Tastes

Tuna were a lifeline for early Māori and they’re still favourite kai today. Here’s a few ideas on how to enjoy them at the table.

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Fusion Dance Crew

The latest Fusion Dance Crew wānanga on the West Coast. Several times a year during school holidays Ngāti Waewae tamariki learn dance moves under the fierce eye of Chantal Tumahai. The wānanga are sponsored by the Ngāi Tahu Fund. This video was created by Sampson Karst.

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Pīngao – Bush and Beyond

Pīngao (Desmoschoenus spiralis), or golden sand sedge is found only in New Zealand and is one of the best sand dune stabilizing plants in coastal areas. It is also a plant of considerable cultural and spiritual significance to Māori. There are legends associated with it and it is highly prized as a durable weaving material….

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Taiaha wānanga changing lives

Over 70 young men gathered at Tuahiwi Marae recently for a taiaha wānanga run by the Tū Toka Tū Ariki Trust. A regular participant, Adrian Boardman (Ngāi Tahu – Irakehu), says the wānanga are the best thing youth and fathers can do. “Being a good father is the most important job you can have. I’m…

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Out of the darkness
– Matariki at Lyttelton Lights Festival

Nau mai e ngā karere ō Matariki tau hou. Tēnā tātou katoa, nga mihi o te tau hou. This weekend I had the opportunity to take part in the annual lights festival in Lyttelton, which happened to co-incide with Matariki, the beginning of the Maori new year. Even though the bite of the cold could…

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Homecoming

Once upon a time there was a sea captain who sailed to the bottom of the world in search of adventure and good fortune. He conquered treacherous seas to eventually make landfall on a remote but beautiful place on the southern coastline of Te Wai Pounamu.

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The Constitution Question

How do you want the future to look for your grand-children? That is at the heart of conversations taking place all over the country about New Zealand’s constitutional arrangements, says Tā Tipene O’Regan, co-chair of a 12-strong panel of academics, law professors, local government officials, media specialists and Māori community representatives charged with driving the conversation.

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A sense of pride

Ngāi Tahu language leaders were recognised at a glittering awards ceremony at Ōtākou Marae that also honoured te reo heroes of the past. In his opening speech, Tā Tipene O’Regan told the audience that the rebirth of Ngāi Tahu reo was in good hands. He said while previously the tribe had been consumed with the Claim, it was time to move on and promote revitalisation of Ngāi Tahu reo.

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Peeling The Onion of Evidence

During the Waitangi Tribunal hearings into the Ngāi Tahu Claim, three historians played an integral part for Ngāi Tahu. Where are they now? In many ways it may have been the making of the young historian. Three years plus in the hothouse atmosphere of Te Kerēme, and the Waitangi Tribunal hearings that would deliver the Ngāi Tahu Deed of Settlement and end more than 150 years of petitioning the Crown.

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Future Vision

Out of the wreck of what was Christchurch, a new city is being planned. It may be a world first situation. In the wake of a devastating natural disaster, the local indigenous people are involved in the redesign and reconstruction of a city from the highest governance level right through to the actual physical reconstruction.

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