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Tuia250 – Encounters

The Tuia250 – Encounters national commemoration was organised by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage to celebrate Aotearoa New Zealand’s Pacific voyaging heritage and acknowledge the first onshore encounters between Māori and Pākehā in 1769–70.

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A treasure house for future generations

On 6 December 1978, a small group of Ngāi Tahu representatives gathered in the Library Committee Room at the University of Canterbury. Ngaitahu Māori Trust Board representative for Te Ika-a-Māui and inaugural Ngaitahu Research Fellow, Tipene O’Regan, addressed the room.
“My motive in taking some steps towards this day and towards this archive are that primarily our people should have a secured and protected treasure house for future generations.”

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A Natural Fix

At just 24, Lucas Smith has packed a lot of life experience into the six years since he left high school. Kaituhi Rob Tipa caught up with Lucas recently to learn more about his latest venture creating natural wool wound products.
A born entrepreneur, Lucas created and invested his life savings into Walk On, a start-up company using the finest merino wool in Aotearoa for blister protection pads. This led him to establish Wool Aid, a business producing a merino wool, completely biodegradable sticking plaster, thought to be a world first.

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Leading change in education

In Japan, when something precious breaks, they repair it using glue with powdered gold mixed in. That way, when the object is put back together it honours the piece it was before, and makes something more beautiful of the new item. It’s known as kintsugi –
golden repair.
This is how it is with Christchurch, but the gold in our repairs is an increasing acknowledgement of Māori culture and tikanga. As the city regenerates post-quake, organisations and businesses, government agencies and policy makers, architects and landscape designers are all taking the opportunity to layer in Māori history, language, and practices that have been largely ignored in 150-odd years of colonisation. It is giving a voice to Māori, and acknowledging and embedding Ngāi Tahu as mana whenua.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Sharon Roberston and her whānau live on 10 acres of lush, rolling Taranaki farmland, 30 minutes drive from New Plymouth.
Horses have been part of her life since childhood. In recent years she has transformed her love of these majestic animals into a business that is helping to change lives.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Tangata Whenua – Tangata Moroiti

Summer is the time when nature is abundantly full of life and the māra is at its most productive. However, despite the obvious beauty of the bountiful summer māra, what we can’t see in our food is just as important as what we can see.
Microbes (moroiti) inhabit a world beyond our normal eyesight. Research is increasingly finding that moroiti can be just as important to our diet, our physical health, and our mental health as the normal nutritional factors we know are in food. Researchers have found that trillions of microbes live in, on, and around us, collectively making up our microbiome.

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Reviews

And then it dawned on me. Whakapapa. Haare Williams was using this poem to teach whakapapa. The whakapapa of the winds. Like Matiaha in Te Waiatatanga mai o te Atua; it was a different whakapapa but whakapapa all the same. Easily formatted, with a rhythm and simplicity that make it accessible. Hidden in plain sight, told naturally, yet with a sophistication that is just clever. I went back to page one and started again, eyes unglazed, and kicking myself for not seeing it sooner.

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Aukaha

The Ashley-Rakahuri Rivercare Group (ARRG) is a nonprofit organ-isation based in North Canterbury, New Zealand. It is devoted to protecting the unique birds living on the Ashley Rakahuri River. Only 18 per cent of New Zealand’s bird population is not at risk. Pollution, climate change, habitat loss, and other factors pose an increasing threat.

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He Tangata
Mike Pohio

Mike Pohio is the youngest of four children and was raised on a drystock farm at Ōkere Falls, near Rotorua. His father was a captain in the Māori Battalion during WWII, and while on a two-year role in the Graves Registration Service immediately after the war, met Mike’s English mother in Budapest, where she was working as a secretary in the British Foreign Office.

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Te Aka Haumi o Tahu Official Launch

Sunday 24 November 2019 Te Aka Haumi o Tahu was officially launched at Hui-ā-Iwi in Murihiku, bringing to life the business directory that nurtures our vision of bouncing the dollar forward and connects us with Ngāi Tahu whānau businesses. Over the weekend we were excited to meet up with some of the Ngāi Tahu whānau…

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