Close

Our Stories

He Tangata
Dr Hana Royal

Dr Hana Royal spent much of her childhood growing up in Tuahiwi before heading to university in Auckland where she studied medicine. After graduating she worked for a time in Auckland hospitals as a surgical registrar before deciding to become a general practitioner.

Read More

Lower price point a winner for Hukafalls Jet

Hukafalls Jet is on track for a stellar financial year. Smart management and innovative thinking have meant the company has had its best October ever, in terms of numbers through the door. This strong month of sales followed a massive month in July as well – the best one in eight years. This support from…

Read More

Oha Honey to focus on sustainable growth

Driven by a strong sales pipeline, the 100 per cent Ngāi Tahu-owned company is forging ahead with plans to increase its production base, while always keeping sustainable stewardship of the land and best practice front of mind.

Read More

Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

As we go to print, the world continues to reel from the incomprehensible impacts of COVID-19, which as we have seen is not selective. Therefore, unsurprisingly much of the content in this issue of TE KARAKA has a COVID focus. Life in the USA – A Grim Reality (page 36) is a poignant piece written by Ngāi Tahu wahine Ila Couch who is currently in lockdown in America. Her honest and sobering account is yet another reminder of how fortunate we are to be living in Aotearoa at this time. Closer to home our cover story, Against the COVID tide, offers a positive story of restaurant owner Sahni Bennett, who is rising above the challenges presented by lockdown to keep the doors of her successful Lyttelton café open.

Read More

From the CEO
Lockdown Learnings

You would be silly to think that working from home over the past three months has slowed productivity to a snail’s pace – from my experience it certainly isn’t the case. Adjusting to staying within your home environment 24/7 was something we all had thrust on us at short notice. Whether on your own or in a house full of whānau, we had to find ways to cope within our confined space. There were many things I noticed during lockdown – from the empty sound of silence at night due to no planes across the usual flight path, to no early morning traffic noise in the distance on the motorway. I also started to notice the beautiful birdsong outside my window, and after checking out all the sounds on Mrs Google, I’m sure I heard the korimako (bellbird).

Read More

Whenua
Tamatea

Tamatea is the Māori name for Dusky Sound in Te Rua-o-Te-Moko (Fiordland). One of the most complex of the many fiords along the coastline, it is also one of the largest. The large island of Mauikatau (Resolution Island) is located near its entrance, and Taumoana (Five Fingers Peninsula) shelters the mouth of the sound from the northwest.

Read More

Ka Hao Te Rakatahi
COVID-19 and Te Ao Māori in 2020

A pivotal moment in our lives. I must admit I have remained pretty calm despite Aunty Cindy declaring a state of emergency and the World Health Organisation announcing this a global pandemic. On the other hand, I am here to hold space for te iwi Māori and let this serve as a reminder that we have the right to make our own decisions about our issues. We’re not here merely to provide ‘advice’ or ‘consultation’. We make our own decisions, period.

Read More

He Whakaaro
When a Fortnite feels like six weeks

I’ve just found out we are going into full-on lockdown. I managed to get back from the Chatham Islands in time and I’m pumped. I have a lockdown plan that will be the envy of all parents. My kids will be better taught, better trained, just all-round better people under my home learning regime. Four weeks they say. It’ll be a breeze – or so I thought.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Rising to the Challenge

Since the outbreak of COVID-19 late last year, the word “unprecedented” has been used countless times by politicians, health officials and media across the world to describe the severity of this global crisis. As the situation evolved, I found myself reflecting on another unprecedented outcome experienced here in Aotearoa – a groundswell of collective kindness and goodwill, accompanied by a widespread willingness to support the government’s strategy to protect our people and eliminate the virus. We saw it when our borders began to close, and those of us returning from overseas went into voluntary self-isolation to ensure we didn’t unwittingly contribute to the spread of the virus. We saw it when we adapted to social distancing requirements, finding new ways to express friendship and aroha.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Kei Te Anga Atu Koe Ki Hea: Where to Post-COVID-19?

I often wonder whether those who started the Ngāi Tahu Claim could have imagined the fruits of their labours 170-plus years on. Take Matiaha Tiramōrehu for example, a refugee from Kaiapoi Pā, who survived extreme hardship and loss, had every reason to give up, but rather than be defeated was somehow blessed with a vision of a better future and became the founding father of Te Kerēme.

Read More