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Don’t just look at the pictures

Atholl Anderson and Brian Allingham were responsible for getting the Ngāi Tahu tribal rock art project kick started. Twenty-five years later, on different sides of the Pacific, both Gerard and Chris have also been immersed in rock art heritage. The pair first met a few years ago at a rock art symposium in Barcelona, and immediately realised the parallels in both their research and their whakapapa. In May 2016, with their PhDs finished, they got together in British Columbia to support a local Indian band excavate at an important rock shelter, and to talk at the Nlaka’pamux Rock Art Conference, hosted by the Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council, in Lytton, British Columbia.

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Mānia – Hardy sedge makes a soft, warm bed

Mānia is a densely-tufted, hardy, grass-like sedge that historical records suggest was mainly used for bedding and waist belts by Ngāi Tahu. Botanical references describe it as a very distinctive ornamental grass with colours ranging from shiny to dark green to yellow/green, red/green, bronze, and various shades of brown or golden brown, depending on the source.

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Simon Kaan – Ngā Ringa Toi o Tahu

After 12 months in the making, Te Rūnanga o Ngāī Tahu launch Ngā Ringa Toi o Tahu, a web series of eight mini art documentaries exploring the practice and success of a number of talented New Zealand artists who also happen to be Ngāi Tahu. The series kicks off today with Dunedin artist Simon Kaan….

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Rakiura Deed – 1864

The Rakiura (Stewart Island) Deed of Purchase was signed at Awarua (Bluff) on 29 June, 1864 by 34 Ngāi Tahu signatories. It gave ownership of Rakiura to the Queen, together with “all the large islands and all the small islands adjacent.” This was the last of the major land purchases in Te Waipounamu. The price…

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Ngāi Tūāhuriri to host Hui-ā-Iwi 2017

The rūnanga and whānau of Kaikōura opened their doors and their hearts to the community and all those in need when the earthquakes struck their region last November. In the face of adversity the whānau of Takahanga Marae put their own needs aside and tended to those of the community, serving over 10,000 meals and…

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Kemp’s Deed, 1848

The Canterbury Purchase, commonly referred to as Kemp’s Deed, was signed by a group of Ngāi Tahu chiefs on board the HM Sloop Fly in Akaroa Harbour on 12 June, 1848. It was the largest of all the Crown purchases from Ngāi Tahu and the least carefully transacted. In 1848, Henry Tacy Kemp, acting on…

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Commitment to reducing family violence

In early June over 120 whānau came together at Rehua Marae for the launch of Tū Pono: Te Mana Kaha ō te Whānau. The Tū Pono strategy aims to reduce the impact that family violence is having in families and communities throughout  Te Waipounamu and Aotearoa, and the launch signifies the next phase in bringing…

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Queen’s birthday honours

Over Queen’s birthday weekend a number of Ngāi Tahu whānau were recognised for their outstanding contributions to Aotearoa. Five Ngāi Tahu were recognised; David Higgins, Heitia Hiha, Susan Huria, Fiona Pardington and Staff Sergeant Tina Grant. David Higgins was recognised as an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to Māori….

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Pounamu taonga showcased in Paris

Earlier this month an exhibition of more than 200 pounamu taonga opened at Musée du quai Branly-Jacques Chirac, in Paris. The exhibition was created by Te Papa with collaboration from Ngāi Tahu and features pounamu taonga from all tribal areas of New Zealand.  The exhibition is called ‘La pierre sacrée des Māori’ (the sacred Māori…

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The Arahura Deed, 1860

Assistant Native Secretary and Assistant Land Purchase Commissioner James Mackay Junior first visited Te Tai Poutini in 1857 from Collingwood. He was greeted courteously at Māwhera (Greymouth) by Werita Tainui’s older brother Tarapuhi, who was said to be a very well made, muscular man over six feet in height. Mackay told Tarapuhi that his land…

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