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Waka revival

Waka play an integral part in our migratory history, as the means by which our tīpuna voyaged here from the ancestral homeland of Hawaiki. They are woven throughout our mythology, with Ngāi Tahu stories asserting that Te Waipounamu itself is the waka of Aoraki, our tipuna mauka, capsized in the ocean with he and his brothers turned to stone along its back as the principal mountains of the Southern Alps.

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Te Pōkai Tara o te Ao

Ten Ngāi Tahu taiohi or rangatahi, preparing for the trip of a lifetime to Silicon Valley to hopefully become part of the next generation of Māori innovators, scientists, and entrepreneurs.

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Toi Iho
Ngā Ringa Toi o Tahu

Ngā Ringa Toi o Tahu not only celebrates the work of Ngāi Tahu artists and looks at what a Ngāi Tahu art aesthetic is – it also gives recognition to people for the work they’re doing on the ground to encapsulate the sense of what it is to be Ngāi Tahu in a solid form for future generations to look back on.

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Korokio – As tough as wire-netting

In Māori tradition, the leaves of either korokio or karamū were used in a ceremony to lift the tapu from foods. The hard wiry wood from its intertwined branches was fashioned into fish hooks, and also made into knives to pierce the skin in treating battle wounds or injuries.

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Reviews
Books

Once there was a beautiful water nymph named Hiriwa (a reo Māori word for “silver”). Every night she would flit along the river and dance under the light of the moon. Hiriwa was watched by Tuna, who longed to glow as she did and thought that if he played with Hiriwa in the moonlight, he would eventually glow like her.

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He Tangata
Warwick Tauwhare-George

From a well-rounded life perspective, my kids and Michael Jordan inspire me. My kids because they are my barometer for ensuring I remain grounded, and realise that life is to be enjoyed with family and friends. Michael Jordan because he continually strived for improvement and realised that hard work and humility played a huge part in his success – just wish I could shoots hoops like him!

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Marae manaaki

When a massive magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck North Canterbury just after midnight on November 14, Takahanga Marae in Kaikōura opened its doors to distraught locals and visitors with characteristic manaaki, promptly setting itself up as a welfare centre for the community.
This was the third largest earthquake in New Zealand in a century and it took the lives of two people. It wasn’t only the marae that showed whanaungatanga to Kaikōura – within hours Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu staff also set out to help whānau in need.

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The Helmsman’s Apprentice

In a few days, Ngāi Tahu scholar Rata Pryor Rodgers will be one in a select group of students swapping the classic Kiwi Christmas for sub-zero temperatures and snow drifts. The reality of a white Christmas in Antarctica is sinking in for Pryor Rodgers, who will head off on Friday (December 16) for two weeks…

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Te Ara Whakatipu

Earlier this year eleven Ngāi Tahu rangatahi experienced Te Ara Whakatipu a seven day hīkoi that follows in the footsteps of their ancestors, on an ancestral trail that travels from Whakatipu-wai-maōri through Whakatipu-katuka and down to Whakatipu-wai-tai. This is achieved through the support of Te Rūnanga o Makaawhio, Ōraka Aparima Rūnaka, Ngāi Tahu Tourism, the…

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