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Issue 66

From the editor

Take a close look at the photo on the cover of this issue. The wahine toa challenging the Minister of the Crown as he bends down to pick up the taki. That scenario hasn’t been seen for hundreds of years, if ever.

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From the CEO

Having applauded the innovative way Ngāti Waewae brought tradition to life through the wāhine mau rākau at the opening of Tūhuru Arahura Marae, I was taken aback to hear criticism of wāhine in these roles. I asked myself, “Is this really the 21st century?” as our history clearly shows wāhine took on these roles far earlier than this.

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He Kōrerorero
Inane Question & A Flag In The Wind

You see, I’m really interested in flags. I have a full-size official flag-pole. I have a collection of flags, from the Hundertwasser to several made just for me.

When there was such an entity as the Ōkarito Free Republic, I was its proud Flag Warden…

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Whenua – Pareāihe

Pareāihe – The extensive volcanic peninsula that juts out from the east coast of Te Waipounamu, southeast of Ōtautahi, has been referred to by successive generations of Māori as “Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū”, meaning “the great food store house of Rākaihautū”.

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Drip feed

Any starting point for a discussion on water has to be the health and well-being of waterways, says Kaiwhakahaere Tā Mark Solomon. And any discussion on water should also include people and their relationship with water.

His comments come after a series of hui held by the Iwi Leaders Group to advise iwi on discussions with the Crown to address iwi rights and interests in fresh water.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Christine home schools all her tamariki. They begin each day with a yoga session, te reo Māori is used as much as English, they take a daily walk along the beach, and in summer the kids more often than not end up in the water. Each of the tamariki have their own work space and direct their own learning, combining computers, iPads, books, and the world outside their door to do their studies.

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Wahine toa

As Te Amo Tamainu challenged the Crown at Arahura Marae, she felt her ancestors with her and her family, in the shape of her father Jerry, behind her.

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Beneath the cloak of Aoraki

Each year Alpine Recreation takes four Ngāi Tahu whānui on the Ball Pass Guided Hike free, to learn basic alpine skills, climb high into the Alps, stand close to Aoraki and look upon his face.

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London Calling

Twenty-year-old James Buchanan, who grew up in Gore, “where there were plenty of men in beards but not a lot of dancing”, is heading to London in August to train at ArtsEd, a prestigious musical theatre school with Andrew Lloyd Webber as its president.

“They call it the triple threat,” James says. “Singing, dancing and acting. I’m terrified but I can’t wait.”

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Road to Redemption

At Te Taumutu Rūnanga near the waters of Te Waihora, Liam joined other men in similar situations. Led by Te Mairiki Williams (Ngāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Te Ātihaunui-a-Pāpārangi, Ngāti Hauiti ki Rata) the men were soon learning the ways of their ancestors.

“The main thing was that Matua (Te Mairiki) made us turn away from distractions. He said us Māori get distracted by too much.

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