Close

Issue 66

The Ninth Tree

How important is mahinga kai to Ngāi Tahu? Consider this. When the Smith Nairn Commission sat in 1879-81 to hear evidence that the Crown had not kept its bargain with Ngāi Tahu, a total of 1712 mahinga kai sites in Canterbury and Otago were identified by H.K Taiarioa and Hoani Korehu Kahu for the commission.

Read More

Global Mana

“There are lots of high points in a job like this. I’ve met the President of Japan, the Emperor of Japan, and Hilary Clinton for instance; and in Japan, I was involved in launching an education promotion project called ‘Game On English’, aimed at improving English language skills in Japan in the lead-up to Japan’s hosting of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics,” says Rebecca Adams, senior advisor on MFAT’s China desk.

Read More

Long play

Ngāi Tahu Tourism boss Quinton Hall describes it as a “kind of mihi”. Whenever he and his colleagues visit China – and they’ve been doing that a lot during the past four years, tapping into an important emerging market – they talk about where they come from, about the history and values of Ngāi Tahu, and the tribe’s identity as tangata whenua of Te Waipounamu.

Read More

Compelling evidence

A prehistoric tōtara waka excavated from a sand dune at Papanui Inlet in October is believed to be close to 500 years old, and is the first waka unearthed on the Otago Peninsula. It is the second-oldest waka ever found in Aotearoa, after the Anaweka waka, found near Nelson in 2012, and thought to be more than 600 years old.

Tāngata whenua from Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, archaeologists, and historians are excited by the significance of this discovery because the waka was built with stone tools more than 200 years before Europeans landed on these shores. Most waka displayed in museum collections today were built with steel tools after the period of first European contact.

Read More

Kā Manukura o Te Reo
Quentin’s journey

Quentin Hix (Kāti Huirapa) remembers a childhood where te reo Māori was only heard on formal occasions. His tāua and pōua, Rosina and Kaahu Selwyn, who had a hand in his upbringing, were native speakers of te reo Māori, but the language was not passed on to him.

Read More

Hei Mahi Māra
Winter a time to recharge

Winter is providing a nice relief for us as we finally slow down after the hectic process of moving back into our new home.

Our new house is great but the section was devastated by the building process and we have had to carry out vigorous reorganisation and replanting. Fortunately, we remembered not to go overboard and plant a whole lot of trees and plants that will need constant pruning. Instead we focused on pongas and ferns to create a Poutini West Coast feel to the garden.

Read More

He Aitaka a Tāne
The binding powers of Akatorotoro are easily overlooked

Akatorotoro is a Ngāi Tahu taonga plant that is easily overlooked in the bush, because of its habit of clambering all over its neighbours on its climb into the forest canopy.

Its thin young vines, when green and pliable, are strong and extremely durable, a primary natural resource used by Māori for all manner of lashings and bindings. Sometimes vines were selected, trimmed, and steamed in an umu to make them more pliable, as the lashings dried hard and rigid.

Read More

Reviews
Books

The journey features 414 pages of photos and images interspersed with text from Muru, Robin, or Sam Walters – the three authors. Bishop Muru Walters is an Anglican Minister, master carver, and former Māori All Black. His son Robin and daughter-in-law Sam are both photographers. Each recites a story from a whānau view with thoughts, discoveries, musings, and impressions from their travels over three years.

Read More

He Whakaaro
The end of the beginning for Te Waihora?

In April 2015 a hearing panel of the Canterbury Regional Council issued its decisions on the Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere catchment plan, which goes by the technical name of “proposed Variation 1 to the proposed Canterbury Land and Water Regional Plan”. The plan has a significant vision: “To restore the mauri of Te Waihora while maintaining the prosperous land-based economy and thriving communities.”

Read More

Ngā Take Pūtea
What financial coaching can do for you

Sometimes we all need a little hand-holding to manage our money better. You know the whānau would be better off if you made changes, but it’s hard to get started.

The answer for some is to get a financial mentor, someone who works with you over time to change your ways financially. Being accountable to someone else and taking small regular steps is proven to work.

Read More