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TE KARAKA

Hiwa-i-te-rangi

Ask anyone who has ever built a boat and they will tell you the experience is all about the journey, rather than the destination. For members of the Hauteruruku ki Puketeraki Waka Club, the journey started more than a decade ago with the vision to build Hauteruruku, a lightweight 18-foot double-hulled waka unua based on a traditional Polynesian design. Ten years later the club has just launched the newest addition to its fleet, Hiwa-i-te-rangi, an 18-foot outrigger-style waka ama based on the same hull design of its double-hulled sister.

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Project Whare Paku

Sitting on the hilltops of Banks Peninsula, dreaming of how we wanted to live our lives together, Jared and I conceived a dream of rangatiratanga. Rangatiratanga over our decisions, rangatiratanga over our kai, rangatiratanga for our whānau and the generations to come. Little did we know that in the years to follow, we would make some bold decisions that would allow this journey to take shape in ways we could have never foreseen.

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Te Ao o te Māori

For Amelia Taylor (Ngāi Tahu) her relationship with Kaikōura Whale Watch is as deep as her love of the sea and the magnificent whales that make their home off the coast of the small township. It was the foresight of Uncle Bill Solomon that led four Kaikōura families to mortgage their homes and finance the fledgling eco-tourism business in 1987. More than 30 years later it is an international success story and the backbone of the local economy.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Wild weeds and asparagus

Two of the most common wild food weeds found in a māra are nettle and dandelions; and while I don’t appreciate too many of them in my māra, I understand there is a place for allowing some of them to grow.

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Reviews

In July TE KARAKA staff were privileged to attend the launch of this pukapuka at Te Rau Aroha Marae in Awarua. This was a wonderful opportunity to acknowledge the partnership between the Whenua Hou Komiti and the Department of Conservation that brought this book to life.

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Aukaha

Mātauranga Pītau Ira is a series of artworks created by Ashleigh Zimmerman (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāi Tūāhuriri) for her graduate exhibition, held at the Whangarei Art Museum in November last year. Ashleigh is a secondary school art teacher, and last year completed a Post-Graduate Diploma of Māori Visual Art through Massey University. Her studies provided a welcome opportunity to explore her whakapapa and sense of identity as a Māori woman.

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He Tangata
Kahurangi Materoa Parāoa Wilson-Mahuika

Kahurangi was raised on the West Coast and has always been fiercely proud of his Poutini Ngāi Tahu and Ngāti Porou heritage. He attended Hato Pāora College in the North Island, originally intending to study archaeology. However, at the age of 14, Kahurangi was lucky enough to discover his true calling while on a hīkoi in the Hollyford Valley, and he changed his career aspiration to Cultural Heritage guide.

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From the Editor

As we go to print with this issue of TE KARAKA, Oranga Tamariki continues to be at the forefront of media attention. As is often the case the coverage is largely condemning of the actions of the organisation and its leadership. I am sure there are many success stories to counter these but I guess they don’t make for such sensational headlines.

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From the CEO
Haea Te Awa

With the government’s Wellbeing Budget now announced, we can get on with our own future planning. For the past 18 months we have been working on turning our attention to better positioning our papatipu rūnanga to lead their own wellbeing, environment, and economic aspirations. The idea of regional development has created a groundswell of interest across our rūnanga, with a number readying themselves to lead the way into local investment opportunities. The thought of creating local employment with our own whānau in our own businesses in our own regions is certainly something to get excited about.

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