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TE KARAKA

Takiwā Tourism

Indigenous tourism has been a particularly fast-growing trend in recent years, with more travellers seeking a meaningful interaction with the traditional culture of the countries they visit. Here in Aotearoa – already a popular tourist destination – more than half of international visitors are likely to take part in experiences where they learn about Maōri culture. This presents an opportunity for flax roots tourism that gives travellers a genuine understanding of the history and values of Māori culture.

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A Master Stroke: Creating the next generation of Māori leaders

Nearly 130 years after Tā Apirana Ngata of Ngāti Porou became its first Māori graduate, the University of Canterbury is achieving success in being the first tertiary institution in the country to offer a Master of Māori and Indigenous Leadership (MMIL) degree. The two-year degree is the brainchild of senior lecturer and Head of School – Aotahi/Māui School of Māori and Indigenous Studies, Sacha McMeeking (Kāi Tahu – Waihao).

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Talking Maunga

A visit by whānau members of famed mountaineer Tenzing Norgay to the Ngāi Tahu rohe has been a meeting of minds and hearts, with strong similarities between our cultures, and shared experiences in the not so fine balance between conservation with tourism.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Harlem-Cruz Atarangi Ihaia surprised herself as much as anyone else when she won the title of Miss Universe New Zealand 2017. The young Ngāi Tahu woman happily admits she is most comfortable in her trackies and a hoody, so when she entered the contest she never thought she’d get past the first audition.

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Autumn Mahi Māra – song of the tīpuna

Autumn is the time of harvest, which makes it traditionally a time of giving thanks to Papatūānuku for the bounty she provides. Early autumn is also the time for winter vegetables to be planted to ensure the māra has a bountiful supply of kai during the winter months – silver beet, kale, leeks, spinach, and brassicas like cabbage (red and green), cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. The trick I have found to growing vegetables in autumn is to make sure the soil has plenty of compost or other organic-type fertilisers.

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Reviews
Books

Roger Blackley’s Galleries of Maoriland is an important new book that focuses on the art of the colonial period in New Zealand and the cultures of Maoriland. Maoriland is, Blackley says, as much a period as it is a place

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Aukaha

Shoe designer Maree MacLean was born in Aotearoa and is of Ngāi Tahu and Te Whānau-a-Apanui descent. She has lived in a number of fashion hotspots overseas including Milan, Copenhagen, Singapore, and Shanghai, where she dressed Chinese superstar Fan Bing Bing, before specialising in shoe design and collection building at the Arsutoria school in Milan.

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He Tangata
Trevor McGlinchey

Trevor McGlinchey began his career as a freezing worker and worked in a number of seasonal and other short-term industries until 1986, when he founded Te Mahi o Waitaki Trust in Ōamaru. This was a kaupapa Māori trust that developed and operated social enterprises and community initiatives.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In the last issue of TE KARAKA we featured an opinion piece by Ward Kamo entitled “Māori victims of crime”. In this column Ward argued that rather than focusing on criminals and the justice system, we should focus on the victims of their crimes – often the offenders’ families and communities – and provide support and skills to help them break the cycle. This view has sparked considerable reaction, not only among our TE KARAKA readers, but much further afield. In this issue we hear an alternative viewpoint from Dr Moana Jackson, who has been actively involved in mahi relating to Māori and the criminal justice system for several decades. Feedback is always welcomed and encouraged, so if you feel strongly about anything we feature, please send us your thoughts.

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From the CEO

It is hard to believe that Christmas is just around the corner once again. As we fast approach the end of another year, I find myself looking back and reflecting on these past 12 months with mixed emotions. On a personal level, 2018 has been tinged with sadness and a huge sense of loss, with the passing of my mother a few months back, and the adjustment to a new normal for our whānau without our beloved Pani. Professionally, it is with a sense of pride at the achievements and progress we have made in the delivery of meaningful outcomes for whānau on many levels.

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