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TE KARAKA

Wai-Toi-Moroki

For the last three years we have seen The Arts Foundation Springboard programme provide funding and mentoring support to seven artists with outstanding potential across a diverse range of disciplines. In 2021 a new partnership between Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and Springboard saw the creation of Wai-Toi-Moroki, a Springboard award dedicated to a Ngāi Tahu ringatoi. Turumeke Harrington is the first recipient of Wai-Toi-Moroki and as such will receive a $15,000 grant, and mentorship from an alumni of Arts Foundation whānau.

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Te Tapu o Tāne

In the heart of Murihiku, four papatipu rūnaka have come together to establish Te Tapu o Tāne, an enterprise founded on the principle of kaitiakitanga – for whānau, and for te taiao. Now in its second year, Te Tapu o Tāne is providing education and employment for rangatahi Māori, and is working with local partners to lead catchment rehabilitation.

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Bowel Screening – Don’t Delay

June Harvey Kitto is a wahine on a mission, determined to share the story of her journey with bowel cancer to raise awareness about the deadly disease. She sits down with kaituhi Anna Brankin to talk about the simple screening process that can save lives by catching cancer early.

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Te Ao o te Māori

A rūnanga business in Kaikōura is changing lives, the environment and the narrative when it comes to pest control in its takiwā.
“The norm for most organisations that operate in pest control has been about eradication,” says Rawiri Manawatu, the Managing Director of Te Rūnanga o Kaikōura, “but we are changing that narrative to restoration – restoring the balance of nature.

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Aukaha

Well-known multi-media artist Vicki is involved in the Paemanu: Ngāi Tahu Contemporary Visual Arts show at Dunedin’s Public Art Gallery. She is also working with Tāmaki Makaurau artist and academic Dr Alex Monteith, and Dr Gerard O’Regan, of Tūhura Otago Museum, on the latest iteration of a longitudinal project that functions in many ways to reinsert our voices into the academic story of the activities of our tūpuna – an art-meets-archaeology multidisciplinary venture.

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Review

The long-anticipated book about Rehua is finally available. A labour of love written by Claire Kaahu White working closely with Dr Terry Ryan, the book has 16 chapters and 335 pages. If you were looking at a comprehensive story about Rehua you may be disappointed and the title is a little misleading. As the book covers not only Rehua Marae, but Māori Affairs Trade Training in Christchurch, the different hostels and key moments and people that were influential in the development of both the trade training scheme and Te Whatumanawa Maoritanga O Rehua Marae through the first 50 years.

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He Tangata
Winnie Matahaere

My first job was in the late 90s where I worked closely with Tahu Potiki on manuscripts he was translating at the time. Tahu also set up the first rōpū of rakatahi, dragging us around the motu and building a sense of connection through whakapapa. He took us up to the signing of the Deed of Settlement in Kaikōura and reminded us of the mahi of our tūpuna, usually heroic or dastardly deeds and always the odd battle thrown in. I am still left wondering about the wives and daughters of these Rakatira.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In a world that is constantly changing and with every decision we make requiring Covid consideration, things that are familiar and unchanged become even more important, providing some sense of “normality” in our lives. TE KARAKA is one of those constants – a taonga appearing in whānau letterboxes at regular intervals for more than 20 years.

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From the CEO
Navigating Change

It’s been an extraordinary year with the Covid-19 Delta variant consuming our every move, and as we race towards the 90 percent double vaccination milestone across the country, a new strain is pushing its way around the world.

If we don’t protect ourselves now then what is the point of “Mō tātou, ā, mō kā uri ā muri ake nei”. It’s incumbent upon us to be intergenerational and that means safeguarding the whānau, the whakapapa and our health in a pandemic world.

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Whenua
Makarore

Makarore is the correct spelling for the Makarora River which flows into the northern end of Lake Wānaka. Manga, or maka in the Kāi Tahu dialect, means stream.

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