Close

TE KARAKA

“Hey Bro.”

For Damien Petersen, the creator of 0800 HEY BRO, it was about recognising the failure of our system to provide preventative support for vulnerable tāne. Generally, the first time people come into contact with the support they need is after a crisis – the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff, rather than the fence at the top. “I was sitting in a room full of men who were mandated to be there, but with no preventative support, and I saw a need. This wasn’t a want, it was a need for our people,” says Damien, who is the Family Harm Reduction leader at He Waka Tapu.

Read More

Tai Wātea
Waves of Freedom

The Live for More Charitable Trust is a values-driven programme that offers troubled rangatahi a second chance. Based in Tauranga, Live for More strives to steer young people away from drugs, alcohol, and crime. It empowers them to live happy and healthy lives, filled with hope for their future.

Read More

Predator Free Rakiura

For many years the Tītī Islands off the coast of Rakiura have been a hard-won sanctuary for our taonga species, thanks to the efforts of a group of dedicated Ngāi Tahu whānau who have been working to safeguard these islands from the predators that threaten our rarest and most endangered wildlife.
Predator Free Rakiura is the ambitious next step in the fight to protect these species, with stakeholders travelling to Rakiura in July to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) reflecting their commitment to ridding the island of predators.

Read More

Hiwa-i-te-rangi

Ask anyone who has ever built a boat and they will tell you the experience is all about the journey, rather than the destination. For members of the Hauteruruku ki Puketeraki Waka Club, the journey started more than a decade ago with the vision to build Hauteruruku, a lightweight 18-foot double-hulled waka unua based on a traditional Polynesian design. Ten years later the club has just launched the newest addition to its fleet, Hiwa-i-te-rangi, an 18-foot outrigger-style waka ama based on the same hull design of its double-hulled sister.

Read More

Project Whare Paku

Sitting on the hilltops of Banks Peninsula, dreaming of how we wanted to live our lives together, Jared and I conceived a dream of rangatiratanga. Rangatiratanga over our decisions, rangatiratanga over our kai, rangatiratanga for our whānau and the generations to come. Little did we know that in the years to follow, we would make some bold decisions that would allow this journey to take shape in ways we could have never foreseen.

Read More

Te Ao o te Māori

For Amelia Taylor (Ngāi Tahu) her relationship with Kaikōura Whale Watch is as deep as her love of the sea and the magnificent whales that make their home off the coast of the small township. It was the foresight of Uncle Bill Solomon that led four Kaikōura families to mortgage their homes and finance the fledgling eco-tourism business in 1987. More than 30 years later it is an international success story and the backbone of the local economy.

Read More

Hei Mahi Māra
Wild weeds and asparagus

Two of the most common wild food weeds found in a māra are nettle and dandelions; and while I don’t appreciate too many of them in my māra, I understand there is a place for allowing some of them to grow.

Read More

Reviews

In July TE KARAKA staff were privileged to attend the launch of this pukapuka at Te Rau Aroha Marae in Awarua. This was a wonderful opportunity to acknowledge the partnership between the Whenua Hou Komiti and the Department of Conservation that brought this book to life.

Read More

Aukaha

Mātauranga Pītau Ira is a series of artworks created by Ashleigh Zimmerman (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāi Tūāhuriri) for her graduate exhibition, held at the Whangarei Art Museum in November last year. Ashleigh is a secondary school art teacher, and last year completed a Post-Graduate Diploma of Māori Visual Art through Massey University. Her studies provided a welcome opportunity to explore her whakapapa and sense of identity as a Māori woman.

Read More

He Tangata
Kahurangi Materoa Parāoa Wilson-Mahuika

Kahurangi was raised on the West Coast and has always been fiercely proud of his Poutini Ngāi Tahu and Ngāti Porou heritage. He attended Hato Pāora College in the North Island, originally intending to study archaeology. However, at the age of 14, Kahurangi was lucky enough to discover his true calling while on a hīkoi in the Hollyford Valley, and he changed his career aspiration to Cultural Heritage guide.

Read More