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TE KARAKA

Whenua

In 1863 Dr James Hector recruited Henare Paramata and five other Māori guides for his Fiordland expedition. On 26 August 1863 Paramata guided Hector into Whakatipu Waitai, where they were looked after by Tūtoko and his whānau. The snowy peak of Mount Tūtoko, which was named by Hector, can be seen in the background.

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The Wisdom of Drug Testing

I write this article the day after the University of Canterbury Students’ Association Tea Party, a big dress-up-themed party on Ilam Fields where students drink in the sun and dance to bands and bass. A few friends asked me if I had put on any sunscreen. I replied that I was a “hearty brown boy” and didn’t need to, so naturally I’m pretty red – sunscreen, water, food, break-out spaces, and support workers were all provided to those smart enough to use them. All told, everyone had a great day. However, one thing was missing – drug testing kits. And by that I mean kits to check that drugs are not cut with dangerous chemicals, rather than kits to test whether you’ve been taking drugs.

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Breaking free from victimhood

Could it be that we have become so defined by our past that the more things improve, the harder we cling to an abstract sense of oppression? Any statistic, even an improving one, that has Māori behind Pākehā is immediately cited as evidence of the inherent and unashamed racism of
New Zealanders

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He Reta

My whole thinking revolves around the idea that we need a complete tribal effort to enhance our natural biodiversity – to enable all of our people to become kaitiaki in action for our whenua, water, and indigenous taoka species. We do have our lovely people from the Te Ao Tūroa team at Te Rūnanga who do wonderful work in this realm, but they have neither the budget nor the capacity to create change on the level that is necessary.

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Māori Victims of Crime – an alternative viewpoint

Sometimes it’s hard to even think about crime. Especially when a violent crime is committed by Māori. It can unleash feelings of anger and sadness because it evokes realities that can be shocking in their brutality. And it’s always hard because most of the victims of offending by Māori are other Māori; often women or children hurt by a violent partner or family member.

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Manaaki ki ngā tāngata

Caring for people comes naturally to Steve Pudney (Ngāi Tahu – Kāti Huirapa) who is a St John Intensive Care Paramedic – although he is quick to admit that it wasn’t the career he expected to go into.

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Moko Kauae
Worn with Mana

These wāhine are certainly not alone in calling on their tīpuna to support and guide them through the painful process of having their identity inked into their skin — an experience that Moana likens to childbirth. “You might think I’m comparing the pain of each experience, but actually it’s about the fact that you come out with such a taonga at the end,” she laughs. “You take the pain because you know what’s coming, and you know it’s worth it.”

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Grassroots to Governance

After nearly a year in the job, Matapura reflects on a remarkable turnaround in the financial position of the iwi since he first became involved in hapū politics more than 40 years ago.

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He wāhine, he manawa tītī: ngā rangatira o Ngāi Tahu

Our Ngāi Tahu wāhine have organised, petitioned, and created change at hapū, iwi, and national level. They are knowledgeable, adaptable, and resilient; taking on the government, the Native Land Courts, leading the Māori Women’s Welfare League, working as cabinet ministers – all while raising the future generation. These are some of their stories.

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Celebrating Whanaungatanga

On 24 November the haukāinga at Ōnuku welcomed whānau from far and wide for a day of kōrero, kai and whanaungatanga. The day kicked off with Hui-ā-Tau, an opportunity for Ngāi Tahu iwi members to hear first-hand from Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu about the year’s achievements. This year had special significance as it was 20 years – almost to the day – since whānau gathered at Ōnuku Marae to hear the Crown Apology, delivered by then Prime Minister Jenny Shipley.

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