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TE KARAKA

Hei Mahi Māra
Plasma in the Māra

I recently came across the Keshe Foundation, which was founded by the Iranian nuclear physicist Mehran Tavakoli Keshe. He has developed some interesting theories around the nature of how the universe works, and how this can be applied across many fields of human endeavour, including agriculture. His theories are based around plasma and how it works, from the largest galaxies to the smallest organisms.

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Nadine Tunley
Leading Change

“The values that steer Ngāi Tahu and their companies are so broad, and so fundamental to human nature. Even though I wasn’t brought up with that connection to the iwi, I have realised that those values were instilled in me by my Dad.”

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Te Ao o te Māori

Helen recalls that whitebaiting was an “absolute commercial necessity” for whānau and in their case helped provide the Christmas presents and any extra things they needed like a new dress or things for the house.

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Reviews
Books

When I heard that Andrew Crowe was the author of a new book about Polynesian voyaging, I must admit that I was both surprised and intrigued. I am a fan of many of his books about New Zealand plants and birds, and therefore I immediately connected the reference to birds in the title of this book with his previous works. With keen interest I embarked on the journey of reading this well-presented book, drawn in by the image of a modern waka hourua on the cover, and backed up by the fantastic and helpful reference map of the Pacific on the inside sleeve.

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Aukaha

Wendy Gomez (Ngāi Tahu – Awarua) speaks off-screen, her voice gently carried over images of a sunshower cutting through dark clouds. In this candid and intimate moment, she addresses her tupuna kuia directly, as if she was there in the room.

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He Tangata
Rauhine Coakley

Rauhine Coakley resides at Arahura, immersing herself in the landscape of her tīpuna with her passion for tramping and fossicking for pounamu on the river. This passion has turned into a livelihood through her work as Tour Guide and Administrative Manager of Hīkoi Waewae – a tourism venture she started in 2016 to help Māori reconnect with their ancestral lands and learn more about native flora and fauna. She is determined to revitalise traditional Māori place names, and encourages others to learn more about their history and correct pronunciation.

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Supporting Mātauranga in the Regions

This is the aspiration and commitment of the regionally-based workforce known as Kaitoko Mātauranga and Kaitohutohu Mātauranga, putting the Ngāi Tahu education programme into action. These kaimahi are the realisation of long-held dreams of rūnanga education representatives providing regional support for our whānau.

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Protecting their future

A dedicated and passionate group of Ngāi Tahu representatives has been working hard on species recovery groups across Te Waipounamu to protect vanishing taonga species, and to ensure that the iwi has a voice in their future.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

And so the seasons are changing once again as winter draws to a close and we move into spring. However, as the impacts of climate change kick in, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the seasons – here in Ōtautahi the daffodils in Hagley Park are blooming earlier each year. Where it really hits home is the changes to Te Ao Tūroa – to our coastlines, our rivers, our landscapes, and, most importantly, our mahinga kai.

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From the CEO

In 1951 more than 90 women delegates gathered in Wellington and became the founding branches of the Māori Women’s Welfare League. The late Princess Te Puea Herangi became patroness, and Whina Cooper (later Dame Whina) was elected President. Over its almost 70 years, the movement has cascaded to all corners of our country and has become a dynamic institution that has been embedded throughout our whānau generations. Today there are more than 3000 members, and the growth continues with the uprising of the “juniors” within some branches.

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