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TE KARAKA

Te Ao o te Māori

Christine home schools all her tamariki. They begin each day with a yoga session, te reo Māori is used as much as English, they take a daily walk along the beach, and in summer the kids more often than not end up in the water. Each of the tamariki have their own work space and direct their own learning, combining computers, iPads, books, and the world outside their door to do their studies.

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Wahine toa

As Te Amo Tamainu challenged the Crown at Arahura Marae, she felt her ancestors with her and her family, in the shape of her father Jerry, behind her.

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Beneath the cloak of Aoraki

Each year Alpine Recreation takes four Ngāi Tahu whānui on the Ball Pass Guided Hike free, to learn basic alpine skills, climb high into the Alps, stand close to Aoraki and look upon his face.

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London Calling

Twenty-year-old James Buchanan, who grew up in Gore, “where there were plenty of men in beards but not a lot of dancing”, is heading to London in August to train at ArtsEd, a prestigious musical theatre school with Andrew Lloyd Webber as its president.

“They call it the triple threat,” James says. “Singing, dancing and acting. I’m terrified but I can’t wait.”

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Road to Redemption

At Te Taumutu Rūnanga near the waters of Te Waihora, Liam joined other men in similar situations. Led by Te Mairiki Williams (Ngāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Te Ātihaunui-a-Pāpārangi, Ngāti Hauiti ki Rata) the men were soon learning the ways of their ancestors.

“The main thing was that Matua (Te Mairiki) made us turn away from distractions. He said us Māori get distracted by too much.

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The Ninth Tree

How important is mahinga kai to Ngāi Tahu? Consider this. When the Smith Nairn Commission sat in 1879-81 to hear evidence that the Crown had not kept its bargain with Ngāi Tahu, a total of 1712 mahinga kai sites in Canterbury and Otago were identified by H.K Taiarioa and Hoani Korehu Kahu for the commission.

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Global Mana

“There are lots of high points in a job like this. I’ve met the President of Japan, the Emperor of Japan, and Hilary Clinton for instance; and in Japan, I was involved in launching an education promotion project called ‘Game On English’, aimed at improving English language skills in Japan in the lead-up to Japan’s hosting of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics,” says Rebecca Adams, senior advisor on MFAT’s China desk.

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Long play

Ngāi Tahu Tourism boss Quinton Hall describes it as a “kind of mihi”. Whenever he and his colleagues visit China – and they’ve been doing that a lot during the past four years, tapping into an important emerging market – they talk about where they come from, about the history and values of Ngāi Tahu, and the tribe’s identity as tangata whenua of Te Waipounamu.

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Compelling evidence

A prehistoric tōtara waka excavated from a sand dune at Papanui Inlet in October is believed to be close to 500 years old, and is the first waka unearthed on the Otago Peninsula. It is the second-oldest waka ever found in Aotearoa, after the Anaweka waka, found near Nelson in 2012, and thought to be more than 600 years old.

Tāngata whenua from Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, archaeologists, and historians are excited by the significance of this discovery because the waka was built with stone tools more than 200 years before Europeans landed on these shores. Most waka displayed in museum collections today were built with steel tools after the period of first European contact.

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Kā Manukura o Te Reo
Quentin’s journey

Quentin Hix (Kāti Huirapa) remembers a childhood where te reo Māori was only heard on formal occasions. His tāua and pōua, Rosina and Kaahu Selwyn, who had a hand in his upbringing, were native speakers of te reo Māori, but the language was not passed on to him.

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