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TE KARAKA

He Whakaaro
Do you have to be a racist to do racist things?

When I think of the future I want for my mokopuna, I imagine one free of racism, prejudice and the barriers that have kept us in the headlines of all the bad statistics and rarely in the good ones. Whether it is Judith Collins playing the racial division card to get votes, Tauranga Ratepayers Alliance’s booing of a mihi, or the online rants of keyboard warriors like Eagle Brewery’s David Gaughan, it’s clear we still have work to do in Aotearoa. A big part of the challenge is that most people don’t see themselves as racist despite exhibiting racist behaviour.

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Kia kuru pounamu te rongo – Treasuring our mokopuna

It’s leading the way in making mātauraka māori the rule, not the exception with a clear vision of ensuring Aotearoa is a place where all mokopuna can thrive. Independent from the Government, it advocates for the interests, rights and wellbeing of children and young people, while also serving as a watchdog of sorts – monitoring spaces where young people are detained, from care to youth justice residences. While 2021 has seen a slew of changes announced within the public sector that signal a deeper commitment to embracing Māori, for Māori models – the announcement of a Māori health authority, for instance – the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) has long been a vocal, and visible, proponent of fully realising the intention of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

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Freshwater – rangatiratanga versus ownership

When Wiremu Potiki stood before the Smith-Nairn Royal Commission in 1880 he made it clear he had claimed Te Aunui waterfall twice when accompanying Walter Mantell in his negotiations with the Crown for Murihiku in 1851.

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Mana whenua rising – Tui, tuia…

Pūrākau and whakapapa. embedded in the landscape, brought to life once more with transmission through whakairo and mahi toi in ways to fit our modern context. The large-scale artworks standing sentinel along the coastline from from Ōaro to Matariki/Clarence serve as a clear reminder of the history, presence and permanency of mana whenua.

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Fighting the good fight in the face of adversity

Blair Vining’s Epic Journey became a leading voice for equitable cancer care throughout Aotearoa, as he fought for an end to the ‘postcode lottery’ that sees many in the deep south face a long wait to access specialist care and treatment. His wife, Melissa Vining (Kāi Tahu – Ōraka-Aparima), has carried on his battle to save the lives of those living throughout Murihiku and Ōtākou.

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Whai Rawa
15 years on

KiwiSaver launched to much fanfare in 2007 with the promise of setting New Zealanders up for retirement or helping them get on the property ladder. But before KiwiSaver there was Whai Rawa, the investment scheme launched by Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu the previous year. As the iwi investment scheme celebrates its 15th birthday, we look back at the journey that has seen the scheme grow to 30,000 members, with over $112 million invested.

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Strategic wetland returned to iwi ownership

Awarua rūnaka has turned the clock back on land lost to the Crown with the strategic purchase of a pivotal 404-hectare sheep and beef farm in the heart of the internationally-recognised Awarua/Waituna wetlands, widely regarded as one of the last remaining expanses of relatively unmodified wetlands left in Aotearoa.

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Missing Connections: how closed adoptions created generations of ‘ghosts’ within our whakapapa

Dr Erica Newman has been awarded the Marsden Fast Start Grant to further her research into transracial adoption in Aotearoa. Over the next three years she will gather accounts and experiences of Māori adoptees and their descendants and document their efforts to connect to their taha Māori. Crucial to her work is understanding how hapū and iwi currently support adoptees and their uri on their whakapapa journey, and in what ways her own experience as the daughter of a Māori adoptee might assist in the future shaping of those processes.

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