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Posts Tagged ‘Anna Brankin’

Moko Kauae
Worn with Mana

These wāhine are certainly not alone in calling on their tīpuna to support and guide them through the painful process of having their identity inked into their skin — an experience that Moana likens to childbirth. “You might think I’m comparing the pain of each experience, but actually it’s about the fact that you come out with such a taonga at the end,” she laughs. “You take the pain because you know what’s coming, and you know it’s worth it.”

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Nadine Tunley
Leading Change

“The values that steer Ngāi Tahu and their companies are so broad, and so fundamental to human nature. Even though I wasn’t brought up with that connection to the iwi, I have realised that those values were instilled in me by my Dad.”

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Ki Te Hoe
Innovating into the future

For generations, Māori have been increasingly disadvantaged in New Zealand society, a fact reflected by disproportionate representation of Māori in low-paid, unskilled professions, and in the criminal justice system. While the settlement of the Ngāi Tahu claim allowed the iwi to re-establish their economic base and build political clout, it was never equipped to reverse the effects of 200 years of colonisation. Twenty years on from settlement, Ngāi Tahu are now in a position to address the social inequities that confront our whānau, and Tokona Te Raki: Māori Futures Collective is paving the way with social innovation.

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For the love of her iwi

Koa Mantell has worn many hats over her 72 years, describing every one of them as amazing. A recent move to Ōtautahi marks the beginning of her reluctant retirement, and provides an opportunity to reflect on a career characterised by a passion for her iwi – from Ngāi Tahu history and arts, to improved health and social outcomes for all whānau members.

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Amanda Malu – the past, present and future of Plunket

Amanda Malu is a woman on a mission – several of them. She uses that phrase several times in our conversation as she describes the changes she’s determined to make, both on a personal level and in her capacity as CEO of one of New Zealand’s largest charities.

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A Second Chance

“By the time I found out I was sick it was so far advanced that they couldn’t do anything about it,” Tahu tells me. “I remember feeling shit all year, and I just thought I was going to get diabetes or heart disease because I was so overweight and I didn’t do any exercise. I was resigned to the fact that I couldn’t do anything about it.”

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Connecting people, place and time

In September, a group of whānau and Department of Conservation (DOC) staff travelled to the secluded island of Whenua Hou off the north-west coast of Rakiura. They gathered to witness the unveiling of three pouwhenua carved by Ngāi Tahu artist James York and supported by the Ngāi Tahu Fund, erected to acknowledge and embody the special relationship Ngāi Tahu shares with the motu.

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Kaumātua care
A Kaupapa Māori model

Our tribal philosophy, For us and our children after us, summarises the forward-looking perspective that sees the iwi focus on development for our tamariki, rangatahi, and young families; on creating opportunities that ensure that the future looks ever brighter for generations of Ngāi Tahu to come. But with an ageing population, there is also a growing need to ensure we support our kaumātua, the very people who have enabled our iwi to continue to thrive.

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Settlement Pēpi

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the settlement of Te Kerēme – the Ngāi Tahu Claim. Since then Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu has continued to grow alongside a generation of rangatahi who enjoy the opportunities our tīpuna dreamed of – or not.

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Post Settlement – the journey so far

Te Kerēme – The Ngāi Tahu Claim – was lodged with the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986, and in the ensuing years of negotiations with the Crown the iwi began to mobilise in preparation for the long-awaited settlement. The passing of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Act 1996 established Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to protect and advance the collective interests of the iwi.

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