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Posts Tagged ‘Anna Brankin’

Tino rangatiratanga: mō tātou, ā, mō kā uri ā muri ake nei

When Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu first reached a settlement with the Crown in 1998, our iwi leaders knew that we would need a robust strategy to consolidate and grow our newly acquired resources.
Over the next two years, a working group of nearly 100 Ngāi Tahu whānau members undertook extensive planning and consultation to identify and define a single tribal vision that would carry us into the future. This was: Tino rangatiratanga mō tātou, ā, mō kā uri ā muri ake nei – the ability to create and control our destiny for generations to come.

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Predator Free Rakiura

For many years the Tītī Islands off the coast of Rakiura have been a hard-won sanctuary for our taonga species, thanks to the efforts of a group of dedicated Ngāi Tahu whānau who have been working to safeguard these islands from the predators that threaten our rarest and most endangered wildlife.
Predator Free Rakiura is the ambitious next step in the fight to protect these species, with stakeholders travelling to Rakiura in July to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) reflecting their commitment to ridding the island of predators.

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Oranga Tamariki
Where to from here?

In April 2017, the statutory care and protection agency for Aotearoa (formerly Child, Youth and Family – CYF) re-established themselves as Oranga Tamariki, committing to a five-year transformational plan to overhaul the culture and practice of the entire organisation. In November last year, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and Oranga Tamariki entered into a Strategic Partnership, in keeping with the government agency’s intention to work more closely with iwi to improve outcomes for Māori.

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Attitude matters

In November 2018 Colleen Brown (Ngāi Tahu – Ōraka Aparima) was inducted into the Attitude Hall of Fame at the Attitude Awards, an annual ceremony celebrating the achievements of New Zealanders living with disabilities. Colleen received this honour in recognition of her contribution to the disability sector over the last 38 years, and is determined to use the award to continue to fight for equality and inclusion – and she is calling on her iwi to support her.

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Takiwā Tourism

Indigenous tourism has been a particularly fast-growing trend in recent years, with more travellers seeking a meaningful interaction with the traditional culture of the countries they visit. Here in Aotearoa – already a popular tourist destination – more than half of international visitors are likely to take part in experiences where they learn about Maōri culture. This presents an opportunity for flax roots tourism that gives travellers a genuine understanding of the history and values of Māori culture.

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Moko Kauae
Worn with Mana

These wāhine are certainly not alone in calling on their tīpuna to support and guide them through the painful process of having their identity inked into their skin — an experience that Moana likens to childbirth. “You might think I’m comparing the pain of each experience, but actually it’s about the fact that you come out with such a taonga at the end,” she laughs. “You take the pain because you know what’s coming, and you know it’s worth it.”

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Nadine Tunley
Leading Change

“The values that steer Ngāi Tahu and their companies are so broad, and so fundamental to human nature. Even though I wasn’t brought up with that connection to the iwi, I have realised that those values were instilled in me by my Dad.”

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Ki Te Hoe
Innovating into the future

For generations, Māori have been increasingly disadvantaged in New Zealand society, a fact reflected by disproportionate representation of Māori in low-paid, unskilled professions, and in the criminal justice system. While the settlement of the Ngāi Tahu claim allowed the iwi to re-establish their economic base and build political clout, it was never equipped to reverse the effects of 200 years of colonisation. Twenty years on from settlement, Ngāi Tahu are now in a position to address the social inequities that confront our whānau, and Tokona Te Raki: Māori Futures Collective is paving the way with social innovation.

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For the love of her iwi

Koa Mantell has worn many hats over her 72 years, describing every one of them as amazing. A recent move to Ōtautahi marks the beginning of her reluctant retirement, and provides an opportunity to reflect on a career characterised by a passion for her iwi – from Ngāi Tahu history and arts, to improved health and social outcomes for all whānau members.

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Amanda Malu – the past, present and future of Plunket

Amanda Malu is a woman on a mission – several of them. She uses that phrase several times in our conversation as she describes the changes she’s determined to make, both on a personal level and in her capacity as CEO of one of New Zealand’s largest charities.

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