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Posts Tagged ‘From the Editor’

Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

It’s hard to believe it is only three months since we published the last issue of TE KARAKA. So much can change in such a short time, as we have witnessed with the passing of a number of whānau and tribal leaders, among them Tahu Pōtiki and Pere Tainui. Over the past year we have had the privilege of featuring stories on both Tahu and Pere – two rangatira with incredible vision and passion for their whānau, hapū, and iwi; and for the revitalisation of cultural practices.

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From the Editor

As we go to print with this issue of TE KARAKA, Oranga Tamariki continues to be at the forefront of media attention. As is often the case the coverage is largely condemning of the actions of the organisation and its leadership. I am sure there are many success stories to counter these but I guess they don’t make for such sensational headlines.

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From the Editor

The challenges of living with and caring for a whānau member with a disability can at times be overwhelming – the lack of understanding and support, the marginalisation, the ignorance – the list is long! It was inspiring to read of Colleen Brown’s recent accolade (page 18) for her lifetime of advocating for equality and inclusion for those living with a disability.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In the last issue of TE KARAKA we featured an opinion piece by Ward Kamo entitled “Māori victims of crime”. In this column Ward argued that rather than focusing on criminals and the justice system, we should focus on the victims of their crimes – often the offenders’ families and communities – and provide support and skills to help them break the cycle. This view has sparked considerable reaction, not only among our TE KARAKA readers, but much further afield. In this issue we hear an alternative viewpoint from Dr Moana Jackson, who has been actively involved in mahi relating to Māori and the criminal justice system for several decades. Feedback is always welcomed and encouraged, so if you feel strongly about anything we feature, please send us your thoughts.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

And so the seasons are changing once again as winter draws to a close and we move into spring. However, as the impacts of climate change kick in, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the seasons – here in Ōtautahi the daffodils in Hagley Park are blooming earlier each year. Where it really hits home is the changes to Te Ao Tūroa – to our coastlines, our rivers, our landscapes, and, most importantly, our mahinga kai.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

Ruminating on the content for this issue of the magazine I am left with a strong impression of anticipation of all things new – new beginnings, new thinking, and new content.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In the 2014 spring edition, TE KARAKA featured a story on Masashi Yamada, the Japanese philanthropist who offered Ngāi Tahu an unsecured multi-million dollar loan that allowed the settlement process to continue at a time when funds were low and negotiations were dragging on. In a further act of generosity, Mr Yamada declined the final…

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

This year marks 20 years since the signing of the Deed of Settlement, a defining moment in a journey of over 150 years, which brought an end to the pain and struggle of a grieving people. And with this closure came a new beginning, with $170m plus add-ons in the bank and a newly formed organisational structure to manage the settlement. However, in celebrating this milestone, it is important to reflect on where this last part of the journey began – the lodgement of the claim some 11 years earlier.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

“Cultural connection” or “connectedness” are terms used with increasing frequency, but what do they really mean? The reality is that cultural connectedness means something different for everyone, and most largely relates to one’s life experiences. In a Ngāi Tahu context, does being culturally connected mean living in the takiwā and being actively involved in the local activities of the iwi, or can one have a meaningful connection living in the North Island or further afield? With more than 50 per cent of the iwi living outside of the takiwā, this is an interesting consideration.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

In this issue we take the opportunity to acknowledge Tā Mark Solomon on his 18 years as Kaiwhakahaere o Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu. We reflect upon his contribution to Ngāi Tahu, to Māoridom, and in fact to the whole of Aotearoa.

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