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Posts Tagged ‘Maatakiwi Wakefield’

He Whakaaro
Titia ki te uma…
Hold fast to your heart…

“E hau nei tō reo pōhiri, ki ngā iwi puta noa i ngā motu e toru – o te Ika, o te waka, o te papaonekura, kia huihui ai tātou…”
The opening lines to ‘Te Matatini ki te Ao’ by Rob Ruha and friends, which became the theme song of the 2019 Matatini Festival of the same name. The last Matatini held in the ‘before Covid-19’ time and space which now seems, for some, a lifetime ago.

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Reviews
Books

He kitenga kanohi, he hokinga whakaaro – To see a face is to stir a memory. This whakataukī embodies this book, published in association with the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki to accompany a major exhibition of Lindauer’s work, displayed from October 2016 to February 2017. This was the largest and most comprehensive showing of Lindauer’s paintings ever.

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Books

Once there was a beautiful water nymph named Hiriwa (a reo Māori word for “silver”). Every night she would flit along the river and dance under the light of the moon. Hiriwa was watched by Tuna, who longed to glow as she did and thought that if he played with Hiriwa in the moonlight, he would eventually glow like her.

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Reviews
Books

The journey features 414 pages of photos and images interspersed with text from Muru, Robin, or Sam Walters – the three authors. Bishop Muru Walters is an Anglican Minister, master carver, and former Māori All Black. His son Robin and daughter-in-law Sam are both photographers. Each recites a story from a whānau view with thoughts, discoveries, musings, and impressions from their travels over three years.

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Reviews

There are many ‘tā moko, tatau, tattoo’ books on the market that focus predominately on the finished artwork or its kaupapa, but few, if any, focus on the tattooist or kaitā who produce these works of art. It is refreshing to pick up a book solely dedicated to showcasing some of New Zealand’s leading skin artists.

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Karanga – A call from the heart

A spiritual call heard across many generations, it is the first voice heard from marae and epitomises the power of Māori women. TE KARAKA speaks with Ngāi Tahu kaikaranga about the ritual of the karanga, its evolution, and challenges.

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