Close

Posts Tagged ‘Matt Scobie’

Marlon

We met up outside the Lyttelton Coffee Company on a sunny Friday at high noon. A familiar space for us both, but far more so for my coffee date Marlon Williams. It takes him three stops to catch up with locals just to get to the counter. I have always found Lyttelton to be a place of warmth and welcome, because of the people who call it home – people like Marlon Williams.
From the marae to the church to the stadium, Marlon Williams is a pretty big deal these days, although he’s too humble to accept that. He is Ngāi Tahu with whakapapa connections to Kāti Huirapa ki Puketeraki, Moeraki and Ngāti Waewae through his mum, Jenny Rendall. Born at home on Cashel Street in Ōtautahi, and educated at Christchurch Boys’ High School and University of Canterbury, Canterbury “is always the anchor.” So why is this Marlon’s place to be?

Read More

He Whakaaro
Studying abroad

In the last five years I’ve gone from being a student who happens to be “part Ngāi Tahu” (whatever that means) to a Ngāi Tahu person who happens to be a student. Other than learning about myself and those who came before me, an important part of this never-ending journey is discovering that some things I’ve been taught are “wrong”. One of these things is how to “do research”. This is all in the context that I’m trying my best to conduct a Kaupapa Māori research project in a city which is almost as physically far away as you can get from our takiwā. From where I am in Sheffield, Ōtepoti and Ōtautahi are the two farthest-away cities in the world.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Climate Change

The first proper essay I wrote was on how we might be able to incorporate Māori principles into accounting systems in order to address climate challenges. It was idealistic. It was romantic. It was read once and then stored away. But importantly, it started me on my current journey.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Our Stories, Our Voice

A story is told at a certain point in time, [but] it has been told across generations. These stories are therefore made up of the wisdom of generations, and will continue to be told and retold into the future.

Read More

He Whakaaro
Resilience in a time of uncertainty

The theme of the hui (also known as COP 21) was promoting the recognition and respect of traditional knowledge in fighting against and adapting to climate change. There was agreement that bringing indigenous knowledge and indigenous people into decision-making and policy development in affected areas was key to confronting the crisis in the coming years.

Read More

He Tangata
Matt Scobie

Matt Scobie is a PhD candidate who begins study at the University of Sheffield this month. His research will explore ways to hold business and government accountable for their wider social and environmental impacts with a focus on engagement around the operations of extractive industries in areas of importance to indigenous groups. He completed a Master of Commerce at the University of Canterbury.

Read More