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Posts Tagged ‘Moeraki’

Whenua

Moeraki Onekakara is the beach on the northern coastline of the Moeraki Peninsula, where the main Moeraki wharf is located today. In the 19th century, the name Onekakara was used to refer to the shore whaling station (established on the beach in 1836), and the European settlement that formed nearby. Traditionally, the name Moeraki specifically…

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Maunga atua

It is a haerenga to bring Moeraki stories to life, and to ensure that those on the Moeraki paepae know what they are talking about. Sometimes the haerenga, which happens every few years, from the mountains to the sea. This time, the Moeraki rōpū is travelling from the coast to the mountains. Along the way they hear the whakapapa of the Waitaki Valley, and the importance of the Waitaki awa to Moeraki. They pass through the landscape as the kōrero comes to life. It is much more powerful this way, experiencing the kōrero among the majesty and power of the whenua, rather than listening to the stories at a wānanga.

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Te Kura o Te Tira Mōrehu Reo o
Moeraki

The wānanga represent a revitalisation of their own, as they emulate the renowned wharekura Ōmanawharetapu that Matiaha Tiramōrehu held in Moeraki until 1868. Tiramōrehu, widely known as the father of the Ngāi Tahu Claim, was also a renowned scholar with extensive knowledge of Māori traditions and whakapapa. He sought to share this with others, and in his wharekura taught Ngāi Tahu tamariki the traditional knowledge and customs that had been handed down for generations.

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Wānanga fosters language

Late last year Moeraki whānau held a three-day wānanga ‘Ko te Tira Mōrehu o Moeraki’ to provide an empowering forum for whānau beginning their reo journey. Supported by the Kotahi Mano Kāika Papakāika Reo Fund, which encourages papatipu rūnanga to develop reo pathways within their papakāika community. Justin Tipa, a teacher at the wānanga, embraced…

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What it means to be Kāi Tahu

From a young age, my sister and I remember being dragged to hui across the country. Now, that is not to say that we didn’t enjoy the hui, but more that we wished that we had a retreat space, a room for us and other rakatahi our age where we could express our Kāi Tahutaka in our own individual way. This became the foundation for the space we filled for Hui-ā-Iwi.

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Mark Adams

1991. Matiaha Tiramorehu. Kotahitanga Church. Moeraki. North Otago. Digital scan from 10×8 inch negative Kodak Tmax 400 negative.

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