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Posts Tagged ‘Phil Tumataroa’

Te Ao o te Māori

When COVID-19 brought the world to a standstill it required some people to strap up their boots and get busy. Waikura McGregor (Waitaha, Māmoe, Kāti Wheke) was one of those people who, protected by a mask and rubber gloves, was out in the community supporting whānau.

Waikura is a Whānau Ora Navigator with Hei Whakapiki Mauri, an Ōtautahi-based organisation which supports Māori, and their whānau, living in the community with disabilities.

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Unleashing tomorrow’s leaders

The whenua kura, unleash the māui programme is breaking new ground for young Māori eyeing a career in the primary sector.

Māori interests across the sector are growing with 50 per cent of the fishing quota, 40 per cent of forestry, 30 per cent in lamb production, 30 per cent in sheep and beef production and 10 per cent in dairy production, according to New Zealand Foreign Affairs and Trade.
However, according to Bob Cottrell (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Raukawa) from the Red Meat Profit Partnership (RMPP), a key partner behind the Unleash the Māui programme, there still needs to be more Māori in the sector.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Ngaropi, the kuia with the moko kauae, would put her walking stick out and touch one of the strands so I knew it was in the wrong place. I’d look at her and I’d shift it and she’d go, ‘kāo, no!’ They would laugh and chatter away, but I didn’t mind at all, because that’s when I really got the feel of harakeke and knew, hey, this is something I want to do.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Sharon Roberston and her whānau live on 10 acres of lush, rolling Taranaki farmland, 30 minutes drive from New Plymouth.
Horses have been part of her life since childhood. In recent years she has transformed her love of these majestic animals into a business that is helping to change lives.

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Te Ao o te Māori

When Max’s girlfriend Carley “busted out” her pepeha, it was the perfect motivation the young videographer needed to start learning his language. “It really inspired me that Carley, who isn’t Māori, could stand up and introduce herself in te reo and tell everyone her whakapapa,” says Max Tiweka, who is Ngāi Tahu on his mother’s side and Ngā Rauru on his father’s side. A year-and-a-half ago, Max started work as an intern at Ariki Creative, an Ōtautahi-based Māori creative studio specialising in digital and print media. It’s that career change Max credits as the beginning of his journey to learn about his Ngāi Tahutanga.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Harlem-Cruz Atarangi Ihaia surprised herself as much as anyone else when she won the title of Miss Universe New Zealand 2017. The young Ngāi Tahu woman happily admits she is most comfortable in her trackies and a hoody, so when she entered the contest she never thought she’d get past the first audition.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Helen recalls that whitebaiting was an “absolute commercial necessity” for whānau and in their case helped provide the Christmas presents and any extra things they needed like a new dress or things for the house.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Keefe Robinson-Gore has a formidable rugby pedigree, but jokes that it hasn’t necessarily rubbed off on him. Keefe (Ōnuku, Wairewa, Arowhenua) is playing his first ever season of rugby for the LGBT team Christchurch Football Club Heroes – the first gay rugby team in Canterbury and one of only two currently competing in Aotearoa.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Jade, with the support of Ōraka Aparima Rūnaka has taken over the marae gardens and nursery area and plans to establish a native nursery which he hopes will be the first step in an ambitious plan to reintroduce areas of native bush to parts of Murihiku.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Taare Wetere Te Kāhu Stuart Home (Ngāi Tahu – Kāti Huirapa), or Wez, as he is better known, has grown up in and around the Waitaki district. As a kid living in Ōamaru he would often join whānau on trips up the Waitaki River to trap and transfer eels during the whakaheke – time of migration.

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