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Posts Tagged ‘Rāpaki’

8th July 2020
Posted under: Pānui

Māori place names to be reinstated around Te Pātaka-o-Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula

Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke yesterday welcomed the reinstatement of 13 correct te reo Māori place names across Te Pātaka-o-Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula. The Minister for Land Information Eugenie Sage formally announced the approval of the proposals at an event held at Rāpaki marae. The decision means the place names will receive official recognition and legal status…

New fishing rules for the Whakaraupō Mātaitai

A south island hapū are celebrating a new bylaw that will limit fishing within the Whakaraupō Mātaitai reserve. Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke say the decision from the Ministry of Fisheries is crucial to safeguarding the local fisheries. Henare Te Aika-Puanaki with this story.

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150 Years Young

Around midday on Saturday 4 May a familiar sound echoed around the seaside kāika of Rāpaki on the shores of Whakaraupō. As has occurred for the past 150 years, the tolling bell was summoning Rāpaki whānau to church. A large group soon gathered outside the newly constructed fence surrounding the church and urupā. Among the familiar Ngāi Tahu faces were numerous members of the Couch whānau, at least two former Sunday School teachers, and officiating ministers and members of ngā hāhi katoa including Rātana, Katorika, Mihinare, Mōmona, and Weteriana.

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A third generation tangata tiaki

It is a daily reminder of the legacy that Tasman (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāti Wheke, Ngāti Kahungunu), hopes to continue. His pōua Bill was a legend in the mahinga kai world and is remembered for his love for customary fisheries, Kāhui Kaumātua (Māori Elders Council), Māori education and his whānau. Uncle Bill was also the driving force behind Kaupapa Kereru, the Ngāi Tahu kereru restoration programme on Banks Peninsula.

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A massive honour

Brett Lee, 28, is the latest from Ngāi Tahu to be invited to attend the country’s top Māori language school, Te Panekiretanga o Te Reo Māori, following in the footsteps of scholars like Hana O’Regan who attended in 2004, and Karuna Thurlow and Kari Tipa, who recently graduated.

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Coast Watcher

Uncle Hori Briggs has been policing the Canterbury coastline in an honorary capacity for the past 14 years. Kaituhituhi Mark Revington reports. Uncle Hori Briggs opens the door of his Rāpaki kaumātua flat on a hot summer afternoon. Come in, he says with a big smile. Once he had an imposing figure to go with that smile. Now he’s a slim wee thing. Throat cancer, he says, without a trace of regret.

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