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Posts Tagged ‘Rob Tipa’

Te Kāika

When Donna Matahaere-Atariki (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Ruanui, Ngā Rauru, Te Ātiawa) was growing up in rural Southland, she was told she had “ideas above her station in life”.

Donna says that professional assessment was absolutely right. Rather than taking offence at a cultural slap in the face, she has used it as motivation to carve a career path as a powerhouse for social change.

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The battle for the birds of Motupōhue

Removing introduced pests and predators from “The Bluff” – an iconic landmark overlooking Te Ara a Kewa (Foveaux Strait) – is the result of a concerted community effort by 25 volunteers from the Bluff Hill (Motupōhue) Environment Trust. The Trust’s work was publicly recognised in November when it won the Environmental Action in the Community Award at the 2017 Southland Community Environment Awards, hosted by Environment Southland.

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Mānia – Hardy sedge makes a soft, warm bed

Mānia is a densely-tufted, hardy, grass-like sedge that historical records suggest was mainly used for bedding and waist belts by Ngāi Tahu. Botanical references describe it as a very distinctive ornamental grass with colours ranging from shiny to dark green to yellow/green, red/green, bronze, and various shades of brown or golden brown, depending on the source.

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Te Whaka a Te Wera

Covering more than 89 square kilometres, Te Whaka a Te Wera is the largest mātaitai in the country by a considerable margin. It encompasses 8000 hectares of sheltered waters within the inlet, excluding about 25% covered by the Ulva Island/Te Wharawhara Marine Reserve, and a marine farming area within Big Glory Bay.

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Pātōtara – The perfect sweet treat

There are not that many native New Zealand plants that produce a sweet and tasty fruit that you can pick and eat straight off the plant.
Pātōtara, a prickly low-growing shrub, is one of the few. Its juicy yellow/orange berries that ripen in summer and early autumn were once a popular sweet treat for Māori and Pākehā children, in the days before they could buy confectionery from the corner dairy.

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He Aitaka a Tāne
Korokio – As tough as wire-netting

In Māori tradition, the leaves of either korokio or karamū were used in a ceremony to lift the tapu from foods. The hard wiry wood from its intertwined branches was fashioned into fish hooks, and also made into knives to pierce the skin in treating battle wounds or injuries.

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Raro Timu, Raro Take

Kelly was awarded two prestigious scholarships – one from the Health Research Council and the other from the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre – to complete her doctorate, tentatively titled Raro Timu, Raro Take – Conception, Creation and Customs Pertaining to Waitaha, Ngāti Māmoe and Kāi Tahu Birthing Traditions, through the University of Canterbury.

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Settlement Stalwart

Ōtākou upoko Kuao Langsbury (80) is one of the unsung heroes behind the tribe’s successful Ngāi Tahu Claim that was finally settled by the Crown in 1998, 158 years after the Treaty of Waitangi was signed. Kaituhi Rob Tipa recently caught up with Kuao at his Dunedin home. “I always said I’d never get involved…

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