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Posts Tagged ‘Sampson Karst’

Written in the stars

The stars have aligned for Dark Sky Project, a bold new astro-tourism venture in Takapō. It’s the longstanding vision of the founders of Dark Sky Project’s predecessor Earth & Sky, Graeme Murray and Hide Ozawa, whose passion is to preserve and showcase the region’s famously dark skies. This purpose has new fulfilment through a joint venture with Ngāi Tahu Tourism.
The new building, named Rehua, boasts a multi-media indoor astronomy experience that combines science and tātai aroraki (Māori astronomy). A mana whenua working party ensured they were able to contribute to the project in a way that celebrated their time-honoured connection to Te Manahuna (the Mackenzie Basin).

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Keeping mahinga kai on the menu

Practicing mahinga kai requires intimate knowledge of our seas and waterways – which makes participation difficult for most Ngāi Tahu living in urban centres. The difficulty is compounded by decreasing water quality and increased pressure on our fisheries, denying us and our tamariki the chance to participate in one of our earliest forms of cultural expression. Pere Tainui is a man determined to keep kaimoana on the menu.

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Cultural Connection – a personal journey

Aoraki Bound is a 20-day cultural and personal development programme. My hīkoi was everything I hoped it would be – a chance to immerse myself in my culture, walk in the footsteps of my ancestors, and gain a greater sense of my identity. The course culminates on the shores of Lake Pūkaki, in the presence of our Maunga Ariki, Aoraki. I parted ways with my rōpū, wiping tears of gratitude from my cheeks, knowing that my life had changed forever.

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Reviews
Books

The book covers the events of the exile of Tāwhiao, the second Māori King, following the final defeat of the Land Wars at Ōrākau, when the King and his supporters were forced into armed isolation, and operated for 20 years as an independent state. The narrative maintains a central focus on the actions of Tāwhiao and the Kīngitanga, whilst weaving in the other related historical figures and events of the time.

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Hokia ki tō Mauka

Iaean says, “When I came back from Outward Bound, Craig and I had a bit of a brainstorm and decided Outward Bound was awesome, but it didn’t have that kaupapa Māori element, tikanga Māori, whakataukī, kīwaha, the stories of the place that give a sense of belonging.”

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Kā Manukura o Te Reo
Quentin’s journey

Quentin Hix (Kāti Huirapa) remembers a childhood where te reo Māori was only heard on formal occasions. His tāua and pōua, Rosina and Kaahu Selwyn, who had a hand in his upbringing, were native speakers of te reo Māori, but the language was not passed on to him.

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Enduring values

Taiaha wānanga have been run at Awhitu Estate, on the edge of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere for the past 25 years. The wānanga are open to boys and men who want to learn the ancient art of mau rākau, not for combat, but to carry traditional knowledge forward into the changing world. The three-day workshops have…

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At sea/welcoming Haunui

“Having some of our whānau from down here on board is a very significant thing. As years go by I think people will come to understand that. I don’t think that it has kicked into the mindsets and the thinking of many people that the arrival of a canoe like this is actually a huge event – something that hasn’t been done for hundreds and hundreds of years.

“I’m not too sure yet if the significance of that effort – in trying to emulate what our ancestors did – is fully realised yet.”

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