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Posts Tagged ‘Tā Tipene O’Regan’

Kotahi Mano Kāika Te Reo Awards

Ngāi Tahu language leaders have been recognised at the Kotahi Mano Kāika Te Reo Awards, held in Dunedin on the eve of Hui-ā-Iwi. The awards celebrate and promote a sense of pride in the revival of te reo Māori in the Kāi Tahu takiwā.

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He aha te kai a te rangatira? He kōrero, he kōrero, he kōrero.
What is the food of the leader? It is knowledge. It is communication.

One of the architects of the Ngāi Tahu Settlement recently created a stir when he suggested it was time for senior Māori leaders to stand aside and allow younger generations to come through in leadership roles.

Tā Tipene O’Regan made the suggestion at the Parliament Buildings launch of the Manu Ao Academy’s Fire that Kindles Hearts: 10 Māori Scholars, a book which profiles 10 respected Māori academics in terms of their leadership roles.

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History never repeats

As the first chief executive of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Sid Ashton was the man credited for the solid foundations which have stood the iwi in good stead.

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A Happy Investment

I still recall the middle-aged American’s line, a half-joke thrown into the wind as our boat flew down the Shotover Gorge at 85 kilometres an hour. “I think,” he said, “I just wet my pants.” I remember vividly, too, our driver, an ice-cool Slavic type in a black roll-neck and leather driving gloves, whose insouciant demeanour spoke of either competence or recklessness, depending on how you felt about being driven within centimetres of the canyon rocks.

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Future proof
What do the coming decades look like for Ngāi Tahu?

Kaituhi Mark Revington reports. What will the world be like for Ngāi Tahu in 2050? Think about it. That is 36 years away. Then think about how far the tribe has come in the comparatively short time since settlement. A heads of agreement was signed with the Crown in 1996 and in 1998 the settlement…

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Te Ara Whakatipu
The Path of Growth

Ten Ngāi Tahu rangatahi walked in the footsteps of their ancestors, deep into the Hollyford Valley and to Whakatipu Waitai (Martins Bay) where they spent a week learning about their tīpuna, their culture, themselves and the environment. Kaituhi Phil Tumataroa reports. The hīkoi, named Te Ara Whakatipu, which translates to ‘the path of growth’, was…

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A Tokyo tale
Why did a Japanese businessman and philanthropist lend millions of dollars to Ngāi Tahu?

The manaakitanga begins when three black vehicles pull up on the forecourt of our hotel on the edge of the Ginza district in Tokyo.

Kaiwhakahaere Tā Mark Solomon and Tā Tipene O’Regan are in Tokyo to present tokotoko and koha to Japanese businessman and philanthropist Masashi Yamada and his right-hand man, Yoshikazu Narimoto, in recognition of an important relationship shared with Ngāi Tahu.

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A vibrant presence

Renowned artist Cliff Whiting had a huge influence on Ngāi Tahu, says Tā Tipene O’Regan, who tells the story of how Cliff came to work for the tribe.

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The struggle for Takahanga

Today Takahanga Marae stands proudly overlooking the ocean on an historic pā that has been occupied for generations. Kaituhi Tony Bridge reports on how the long-standing vision for the marae was finally realised. Hariata Manawatu, of Kāti Kurī, vividly remembers those early fundraising days for Takahanga Marae. “You know, we must have been fundraising since…

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The Lifeline

The business card simply says Dr Graham Kitson, Relationship Director. Nothing here to suggest that the man sitting in front of me helped kept Te Kerēme on track in the 1990s.

However it was Dr Graham Kitson’s introduction of Tipene O’Regan to Japanese businessman and philanthropist Masashi Yamada that enabled a lifeline to be extended to Ngāi Tahu while the tribe waited for the result of its Waitangi Tribunal hearings. It came in in the form of a series of loans which enabled the tribe to continue with Te Kerēme.

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