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Posts Tagged ‘Tane Davis’

Predator Free Rakiura

For many years the Tītī Islands off the coast of Rakiura have been a hard-won sanctuary for our taonga species, thanks to the efforts of a group of dedicated Ngāi Tahu whānau who have been working to safeguard these islands from the predators that threaten our rarest and most endangered wildlife.
Predator Free Rakiura is the ambitious next step in the fight to protect these species, with stakeholders travelling to Rakiura in July to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) reflecting their commitment to ridding the island of predators.

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Protecting their future

A dedicated and passionate group of Ngāi Tahu representatives has been working hard on species recovery groups across Te Waipounamu to protect vanishing taonga species, and to ensure that the iwi has a voice in their future.

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Connecting people, place and time

In September, a group of whānau and Department of Conservation (DOC) staff travelled to the secluded island of Whenua Hou off the north-west coast of Rakiura. They gathered to witness the unveiling of three pouwhenua carved by Ngāi Tahu artist James York and supported by the Ngāi Tahu Fund, erected to acknowledge and embody the special relationship Ngāi Tahu shares with the motu.

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Protecting our tītī

The Davis whānau of Murihiku are well-known as a staunch tītī whānau. Over the years they have poured time, energy, and resources into their taonga, determined to “walk the kaitiaki talk” by caring for their islands, and the many species that call (or have called) them home.
The measures they have taken to eradicate pest species are a crucial part of this.

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Whenua Hou

Ngāi Tahu carver James York (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Māmoe, Waitaha, Rapuwai) is carving pou to be erected on Whenua Hou to honour the unique connection of Ngāi Tahu with the island. Nā Kahu Te Whaiti. Whenua Hou, an island north-west of Rakiura, was an important stopping point for muttonbirders travelling to the Tītī islands. In…

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