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Posts Tagged ‘Te Ao o te Māori’

Te Ao o te Māori

When Max’s girlfriend Carley “busted out” her pepeha, it was the perfect motivation the young videographer needed to start learning his language. “It really inspired me that Carley, who isn’t Māori, could stand up and introduce herself in te reo and tell everyone her whakapapa,” says Max Tiweka, who is Ngāi Tahu on his mother’s side and Ngā Rauru on his father’s side. A year-and-a-half ago, Max started work as an intern at Ariki Creative, an Ōtautahi-based Māori creative studio specialising in digital and print media. It’s that career change Max credits as the beginning of his journey to learn about his Ngāi Tahutanga.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Harlem-Cruz Atarangi Ihaia surprised herself as much as anyone else when she won the title of Miss Universe New Zealand 2017. The young Ngāi Tahu woman happily admits she is most comfortable in her trackies and a hoody, so when she entered the contest she never thought she’d get past the first audition.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Helen recalls that whitebaiting was an “absolute commercial necessity” for whānau and in their case helped provide the Christmas presents and any extra things they needed like a new dress or things for the house.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Keefe Robinson-Gore has a formidable rugby pedigree, but jokes that it hasn’t necessarily rubbed off on him. Keefe (Ōnuku, Wairewa, Arowhenua) is playing his first ever season of rugby for the LGBT team Christchurch Football Club Heroes – the first gay rugby team in Canterbury and one of only two currently competing in Aotearoa.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Jade, with the support of Ōraka Aparima Rūnaka has taken over the marae gardens and nursery area and plans to establish a native nursery which he hopes will be the first step in an ambitious plan to reintroduce areas of native bush to parts of Murihiku.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Taare Wetere Te Kāhu Stuart Home (Ngāi Tahu – Kāti Huirapa), or Wez, as he is better known, has grown up in and around the Waitaki district. As a kid living in Ōamaru he would often join whānau on trips up the Waitaki River to trap and transfer eels during the whakaheke – time of migration.

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Te Ao o te Māori

For more than 80 years the Te Waipounamu Māori Girls’ College helped young girls grow to become young women. Recently a small group of former Te Wai girls came together at the old Ferry Road school site in Christchurch to reminisce and help celebrate a significant birthday for former college Matron Reihana Parata; aka Aunty Doe or just “Mum” for the old girls of Te Wai

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Te Ao o te Māori

Motoring up the shipping channel of the Whangārei Harbour, Hayden Smith suddenly slows the Sea Cleaners boat and arcs it hard right. He’s spotted something in the water. It’s a piece of plastic, which he expertly manoeuvres towards before grabbing a net to scoop it from the ocean. He’s done this a thousand times before – it’s what feeds him, drives him, and helps to give his life purpose.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Rex Anglem loves getting out of bed and going to work.
“I don’t know what I’ll do when I retire. To be honest I’ll retire when I’ve got a wooden suit on me,” he says with a chuckle.

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Te Ao o te Māori

Tiaki has a wry smile as he reflects on the journey that has led him away from Te Waipounamu to the rugged Raglan west coast, where he has lived for the past four years with partner Madi Watson and their two-year-old son, Tāwhai.

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