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Posts Tagged ‘Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu’

Te Ao o te Māori

When COVID-19 brought the world to a standstill it required some people to strap up their boots and get busy. Waikura McGregor (Waitaha, Māmoe, Kāti Wheke) was one of those people who, protected by a mask and rubber gloves, was out in the community supporting whānau.

Waikura is a Whānau Ora Navigator with Hei Whakapiki Mauri, an Ōtautahi-based organisation which supports Māori, and their whānau, living in the community with disabilities.

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Keeping mahinga kai on the menu

Practicing mahinga kai requires intimate knowledge of our seas and waterways – which makes participation difficult for most Ngāi Tahu living in urban centres. The difficulty is compounded by decreasing water quality and increased pressure on our fisheries, denying us and our tamariki the chance to participate in one of our earliest forms of cultural expression. Pere Tainui is a man determined to keep kaimoana on the menu.

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Māori Trade Training reborn

He Toki ki te Mahi has created economic value of more than $5.5 million since 2015. Further analysis suggests the potential to return seven times the value of the investment in economic benefits to the apprentices and the economy.

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Post Settlement – the journey so far

Te Kerēme – The Ngāi Tahu Claim – was lodged with the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986, and in the ensuing years of negotiations with the Crown the iwi began to mobilise in preparation for the long-awaited settlement. The passing of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Act 1996 established Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to protect and advance the collective interests of the iwi.

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Te Kura o Te Tira Mōrehu Reo o
Moeraki

The wānanga represent a revitalisation of their own, as they emulate the renowned wharekura Ōmanawharetapu that Matiaha Tiramōrehu held in Moeraki until 1868. Tiramōrehu, widely known as the father of the Ngāi Tahu Claim, was also a renowned scholar with extensive knowledge of Māori traditions and whakapapa. He sought to share this with others, and in his wharekura taught Ngāi Tahu tamariki the traditional knowledge and customs that had been handed down for generations.

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Healthy Kai
Māori Styles

Starting with a passion for gardening, Jade Temepara’s ambitions may very well be the next step to ensuring our whānau are healthy and thriving. “It’s about everything: employment, enterprise, education, health, wellbeing, connectedness, and just feeling comfortable in a community we have felt quite distant from for a long time.”

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