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Posts Tagged ‘Te Waipounamu’

Ka taki mai te māuru
When the nor’wester howls

At the inaugural Māori Climate Forum in Wellington in 2003, formal recognition of traditional Māori understandings of weather and climate variability and change was made, with several Māori elders highlighting the importance of giving a greater account of this knowledge of the environment.

Building on these initial efforts, in January 2016 Te Kūwaha-o-Taihoro-Nukurangi was awarded research funding from the Vision Mātauranga government science programme, as part of the Deep South National Science Challenge. This funding enables the team to work closely with knowledge holders from Ngāi Tahu whānui to identify, revitalise, and promote the use of environmental indicators to forecast weather and climate extremes.

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Kā Huru Manu

Kā Huru Manu is the highly-anticipated result of the Ngāi Tahu Cultural Mapping Project – a digital atlas that holds over 1000 traditional Māori place names in Te Waipounamu, and their associated histories.

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New day rising

The Kāti Huirapa marae at Arowhenua has been a focal point for Kāi Tahu for more than 100 years, and has entered a brand new dawn with its redevelopment.

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Whenua

Tūtakahikura is the beach immediately south of the old kaik on the Moeraki peninsula. In the late 19th century it was home to one of the largest Ngāi Tahu settlements on the east coast of Te Waipounamu.

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Compelling evidence

A prehistoric tōtara waka excavated from a sand dune at Papanui Inlet in October is believed to be close to 500 years old, and is the first waka unearthed on the Otago Peninsula. It is the second-oldest waka ever found in Aotearoa, after the Anaweka waka, found near Nelson in 2012, and thought to be more than 600 years old.

Tāngata whenua from Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, archaeologists, and historians are excited by the significance of this discovery because the waka was built with stone tools more than 200 years before Europeans landed on these shores. Most waka displayed in museum collections today were built with steel tools after the period of first European contact.

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The science of strandings

The tragic stranding of nine orca in western Southland earlier this year prompted a blueprint for customary recovery. Kaituhi Rob Tipa investigates. The mass stranding of a pod of nine orca on an isolated beach in Te Waewae Bay in western Southland in February was a rare event that may have a positive outcome for…

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Ancient paths

In the old days Ngāi Tahu hunted and gathered animals and plants the length and breadth of Te Waipounamu. They moved according to the season, following life cycles of animals and plants, and they had access to a wide variety and abundance of food resources.

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Relativity Speaking

The relativity clause built into the Ngāi Tahu Settlement is predicted to come into force within the next twelve months. What does it mean for the iwi?

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27th February 2012
Posted under: Pānui

Prestigious Kapa Haka festival to be held in Christchurch in 2015

27 February, 2012 The biannual Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival, where elite kapa haka performers from around New Zealand and Australia come together to compete, will be held in Christchurch in 2015. Christchurch won its bid to host this prestigious cultural event after the Waitaha Cultural Council supported by representatives from the Christchurch City…

1st February 2012
Posted under: Pānui

Ngāi Tahu Treaty Festival, Te Rau Aroha Marae, Monday 6 February

1 February Discussion on the current review of the New Zealand Constitution and the restoration of Waituna Lagoon will be highlights of this year’s Ngāi Tahu Waitangi Day commemoration festivities. Awarua Rūnanga will host the festivities at Te Rau Aroha Marae, at Awarua (Bluff), on Monday 6 February. The location is significant as in 1840,…