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Posts Tagged ‘Tony Bridge’

Whenua
Moturau

Moturau is the correct Māori name for Lake Manapōuri in Te Rua-o-te-Moko (Fiordland). Roto-Ua is an earlier name for the lake, and was given by the Waitaha explorer Rākaihautū when digging the lake with his kō, on account of the persistent rain that troubled his party here. Puhiruru (Rona Island) is the island in the…

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Whenua

Kā Roimata-a-Hinehukatere Kā Roimata-a-Hinehukatere is the traditional Māori name for the Franz Josef Glacier. Hinehukatere was a woman who in ancient times had a passion for mountaineering, but her sweetheart Wawe was not as agile as her.

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Whenua

Taramakau The Taramakau River rises in Kā Tiritiri-o-te-moana (the Southern Alps) and flows into Te Tai-o-Rehua (the Tasman Sea) south of Greymouth. The upper reaches of the Taramakau are renowned as a source of pounamu, with several significant pounamu working sites located at the river mouth.

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Whenua

Awarua (the Haast River) flows from Kā Tiritiri-o-te-moana (the Southern Alps) into Te Tai-o-Rehua (the Tasman Sea) north of Ōkahu (Jackson Bay). Awarua was part of the traditional travel route over Tioripātea (Haast Pass) and along the Makarore (Makarora River) that connected Te Tai Poutini (the West Coast) with lakes Wānaka and Hāwea. During the…

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Whenua

Horomaka Horomaka Island in Koukourārata (Port Levy) commemorates the arrival of the Makawhiu waka in Canterbury. After Tūtekawa killed the wives of his brother-in-law Tūāhuriri at Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington), he escaped to Te Waipounamu, where he established Waikākahi pā on the eastern shore of Te Waihora (Lake Ellesmere). Determined to exact revenge, Moki, the son…

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Whenua

Otago Harbour Ōtākou was the name for a channel that ran down the eastern (southern) side of the Otago Harbour from the mouth to Harwood Point, past the whaling station site and main Māori villages. Aramoana ran down the western (northern) side through to Port Chalmers. Today the name Ōtākou specifically refers to the small…

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Whenua

Te Hakapupu Te Hakapupu (Pleasant River) rises in the hilly forested country before flowing in a generally eastward direction entering the Otago coastline between Matakaea (Shag Point) and the Waikouaiti River. The prevalent estuary situated at the river mouth has historically been a rich source of mahinga kai with extensive Māori archaeological sites situated nearby.

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Whenua

Manuhaea was traditionally a kāinga mahinga kai (food-gathering settlement) and kāinga nohoanga (settlement) on the eastern side of “the Neck” – the narrow isthmus of land separating lakes Hāwea and Wānaka.

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Whenua

The Rakahuri (Ashley River) is one of the numerous rivers that flow into Te Tai o Maahunui (Pegasus Bay). The river and its associated tributaries, wetlands, and lagoons were traditionally well known for their mahinga kai values.

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