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Posts Tagged ‘Tremane Barr’

Hei Mahi Māra
Kai to Power up the Immune System

It has been a strange and somewhat frightening start to 2020 with the release of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV2) casting a dark shadow across the world.

As we look to the night sky for the return of Matariki (July 13-16) and a new year, I think it is important to focus on what we can do to empower ourselves. It’s not enough to set up roadside checkpoints to discourage unnecessary travel as seen in previous lockdown levels – we all need to take responsibility for our own health to ensure our body’s immune system has everything it needs to deal with any virus that might come our way.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Ecopsychology and the Māra

Autumn is a time to optimistically look forward to a bountiful harvest from the hard work put in through spring and summer. As I have said in recent articles, the benefits of having a māra are multi-faceted; not least of all getting the nutrition we need to feed all the bugs and bacteria that make up our internal microbiome and help keep us physically healthy. Research is also increasingly showing that the psychological benefit of just being in nature is also very important for our sense of wellbeing.

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Essential Healing

For Tremane (Ngāi Tahu) and Jytte, the move to buy Zurma was a good fit with their values. Jytte had been buying Zurma oils for more than 20 years in her work as a massage therapist, and Tremane has long been interested in organic gardening.
But just two weeks after purchasing Zurma, Tremane was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. He was told that his cancer was untreatable, and terminal.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Tangata Whenua – Tangata Moroiti

Summer is the time when nature is abundantly full of life and the māra is at its most productive. However, despite the obvious beauty of the bountiful summer māra, what we can’t see in our food is just as important as what we can see.
Microbes (moroiti) inhabit a world beyond our normal eyesight. Research is increasingly finding that moroiti can be just as important to our diet, our physical health, and our mental health as the normal nutritional factors we know are in food. Researchers have found that trillions of microbes live in, on, and around us, collectively making up our microbiome.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Wild weeds and asparagus

Two of the most common wild food weeds found in a māra are nettle and dandelions; and while I don’t appreciate too many of them in my māra, I understand there is a place for allowing some of them to grow.

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Hei Mahi Māra

I harvested my first ever kūmara from the māra in late autumn and was stunned to find that I had actually managed to grow a worthwhile crop. I could see that the leaves had grown prolifically over summer and into autumn, but was completely taken by surprise when I actually dug them up to find the quantity and size of tubers that had been produced. I had always assumed that it would be too cold to grow kūmara in Ōtautahi so I hadn’t even bothered to try in my 30-plus years of organic gardening.

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Autumn Mahi Māra – song of the tīpuna

Autumn is the time of harvest, which makes it traditionally a time of giving thanks to Papatūānuku for the bounty she provides. Early autumn is also the time for winter vegetables to be planted to ensure the māra has a bountiful supply of kai during the winter months – silver beet, kale, leeks, spinach, and brassicas like cabbage (red and green), cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. The trick I have found to growing vegetables in autumn is to make sure the soil has plenty of compost or other organic-type fertilisers.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Plasma in the Māra

I recently came across the Keshe Foundation, which was founded by the Iranian nuclear physicist Mehran Tavakoli Keshe. He has developed some interesting theories around the nature of how the universe works, and how this can be applied across many fields of human endeavour, including agriculture. His theories are based around plasma and how it works, from the largest galaxies to the smallest organisms.

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Hei Mahi Māra
How to grow artichokes

The dark days and rain of winter are receding, with the extra light and warmth of spring starting to kick in. I love getting stuck into the māra at this time of year; getting it ready by clearing away the winter weeds, digging in the lupin cover crop, and fertilising the soil with dolomite lime and compost in anticipation of the food delights to come.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Fruit for thought

Winter is a time of rest for both the māra and the gardener. There are, however, still tasks that need to be carried out in preparation for the growth and abundance of spring and summer. The winter vegetables need to be kept an eye on to ensure that the weeds don’t take over.

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