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Posts Tagged ‘Ward Kamo’

He Whakaaro
Oranga Tamariki – Not one more baby?

Not a week after Māoridom erupted over the harrowing images of a baby being uplifted from its mother in Napier earlier this year, another baby was killed in his home. This murdered baby was one of six children – the other five had previously been uplifted by Oranga Tamariki. Some rangatira have been quick to criticise the Oranga Tamariki uplifts with cries of “Not one more baby”.

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He Whakaaro
“Hello, brother”

On Friday 15 March 2019 Haji-Daoud Nabi stood at the door of the Al Noor mosque and welcomed his killer with the words, “Hello, brother.” These two words of faith, of welcome, and of fellowship are the light of hope that shone brightly that dark day. There was no anger in the voice of Haji-Daoud Nabi, who would be killed for his faith. There was no aggression. There were just two gentle words of welcome that will reverberate throughout our history.

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Breaking free from victimhood

Could it be that we have become so defined by our past that the more things improve, the harder we cling to an abstract sense of oppression? Any statistic, even an improving one, that has Māori behind Pākehā is immediately cited as evidence of the inherent and unashamed racism of
New Zealanders

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Māori Victims of Crime – an alternative viewpoint

Sometimes it’s hard to even think about crime. Especially when a violent crime is committed by Māori. It can unleash feelings of anger and sadness because it evokes realities that can be shocking in their brutality. And it’s always hard because most of the victims of offending by Māori are other Māori; often women or children hurt by a violent partner or family member.

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Māori victims of crime

A lack of education, poor life, financial and social skills, hand-in-hand with poor parenting, are at the root of crime. The solutions involve support to the parents of at-risk kids. We must ruthlessly address these issues early, and, as whānau, demand the resources to keep these kids at school, and even, if necessary, to keep their parents away from them.

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Charitable status

It is by every measure a success story for the ages. From a position of total ownership of Te Waipounamu (Te Tau Ihu bits excluded) in 1840 to being virtually landless just 25 years later, the recovery is today complete. Ngāi Tahu is poised in the next few years to begin delivering social investment outcomes that may eventually see it overtake the central government in this respect.

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Iwi Chairs Forum

From being the literal kings of the castle in 1840 to virtually impoverished not 30 years later is a stunning reversal of fortune. But what’s more stunning is the recent rise of the Ngāi Tahu phoenix from the ashes of that time – well, at least economically.

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The Māori Party – what went wrong?

A lasting image from the 2017 general election was Te Ururoa Flavell’s open tears and heartbreak at losing Waiariki, knowing that loss spelt the end of the Māori Party. It was a shock for many, with genuine sorrow expressed across the political spectrum.

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Best person for the job

He Whakaaro Nā Ward Kamo “This was the command thy love laid upon these Governors. That the law be made one, that the commandments be made one, that the nation be made one, that the white skin be made just as equal with the dark skin. And to lay down the love of thy graciousness…

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