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Issue 66

Long play

Ngāi Tahu Tourism boss Quinton Hall describes it as a “kind of mihi”. Whenever he and his colleagues visit China – and they’ve been doing that a lot during the past four years, tapping into an important emerging market – they talk about where they come from, about the history and values of Ngāi Tahu, and the tribe’s identity as tangata whenua of Te Waipounamu.

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Compelling evidence

A prehistoric tōtara waka excavated from a sand dune at Papanui Inlet in October is believed to be close to 500 years old, and is the first waka unearthed on the Otago Peninsula. It is the second-oldest waka ever found in Aotearoa, after the Anaweka waka, found near Nelson in 2012, and thought to be more than 600 years old.

Tāngata whenua from Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, archaeologists, and historians are excited by the significance of this discovery because the waka was built with stone tools more than 200 years before Europeans landed on these shores. Most waka displayed in museum collections today were built with steel tools after the period of first European contact.

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Kā Manukura o Te Reo
Quentin’s journey

Quentin Hix (Kāti Huirapa) remembers a childhood where te reo Māori was only heard on formal occasions. His tāua and pōua, Rosina and Kaahu Selwyn, who had a hand in his upbringing, were native speakers of te reo Māori, but the language was not passed on to him.

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Hei Mahi Māra
Winter a time to recharge

Winter is providing a nice relief for us as we finally slow down after the hectic process of moving back into our new home.

Our new house is great but the section was devastated by the building process and we have had to carry out vigorous reorganisation and replanting. Fortunately, we remembered not to go overboard and plant a whole lot of trees and plants that will need constant pruning. Instead we focused on pongas and ferns to create a Poutini West Coast feel to the garden.

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