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TE KARAKA

Reviews

This book is anchored at Awarua. It offers rich and revealing windows into southern Kāi Tahu life on the coasts and waters of southern Murihiku. People who live seasonal existences in this part of Te Waipounamu – think muttonbirding, oystering and fishing – see their friends, cousins, and themselves in this book.

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Aukaha

Aukaha is a regular feature that celebrates the creative talent of Ngāi Tahu whānau. I First Heard Woody Guthrie At Moeraki nā Rangi Faith and Taonga Pūoru nā Teoti Jardine.

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He Tangata
Maui Brennan

Maui Brennan (Ngāi Tahu – Ngāi Tūāhuriri) grew up in Ōtautahi in a bicultural household. Being of Italian and Māori whānau, Maui appreciates not only the similarities between his two cultures, but also the strong sense of identity that has blossomed from his upbringing.

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Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

For most Ngāi Tahu the connection to and passion for mahinga kai pulses through their veins – it’s in the DNA. Traditionally the gathering of kai was a huge part of whānau life and survival, and it’s not that different now. Each year when the season comes whānau gravitate to their awa to get themselves a feed of that precious little fish known as īnanga. Sadly, the ongoing degradation of our environment continues to impact negatively on many of our taonga species and whitebait is no exception. There’s no denying there isn’t as much bait around as there used to be, but the government’s recently proposed changes to whitebait management blatantly contravene its legal responsibility to tangata whenua as Treaty partners, and shows disregard for the customary practices that have sustained many generations of whānau. In this issue of TE KARAKA assistant editor Anna Brankin speaks to Ngāi Tahu whitebaiters from around the takiwā to get their views on the matter

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