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TE KARAKA

Time to raise the gaze

The practice of sorting students into classes based on their perceived abilities – streaming – has been the status quo in schools throughout Aotearoa for many years. New research reveals that this age-old practice is biased and as a result negatively impacting the educational potential of many of our rangatahi.

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Making the cut

“It chose me. I never planned any of this,” Niko says of his flourishing shop Georgetown Barbers on the fringe of Invercargill’s central business district.

About eight years ago he started cutting hair for his son and brothers and the idea of becoming a barber snowballed from there. His career choices at the time were either farming or barbering. Farming didn’t work out so he completed a three-month New Zealand Barber Skills Certificate course in Auckland.

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Growing Māori engagement in our foreign affairs

Each year, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) offers a range of paid summer internships for university students. The Arorere Internship Programme targets applicants of Māori descent, specifically rangatahi who are still studying or have recently completed their formal qualifications. It offers tauira Māori the opportunity to work in one of the Ministry’s business units with support and guidance from the wider MFAT team, including its Te Pou Māori network.

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Te Whare Taonga ki Kawatea

When Kōtukumairangi was paddled down the Ōpara River on Waitangi Day this year it marked 20 years since the waka had been formally gifted to Ngāi Tahu by the late Murray Thacker (1933-2017), founder of the Okains Bay Māori and Colonial Museum. Craig Pauling and Iaean Cranwell have been the unofficial kaitiaki of Kōtukumairangi for much of that time, taking responsibility for training and coordination of paddlers, and overseeing care and maintenance of the waka, in collaboration with museum volunteers and staff. In so doing they have been contributing to the intergenerational history of Ngāi Tahu involvement with the museum (and its famous Waitangi Day commemorations) that stretches back almost half a century.

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