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Tuia250 – Encounters

The Tuia250 – Encounters national commemoration was organised by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage to celebrate Aotearoa New Zealand’s Pacific voyaging heritage and acknowledge the first onshore encounters between Māori and Pākehā in 1769–70.

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A treasure house for future generations

On 6 December 1978, a small group of Ngāi Tahu representatives gathered in the Library Committee Room at the University of Canterbury. Ngaitahu Māori Trust Board representative for Te Ika-a-Māui and inaugural Ngaitahu Research Fellow, Tipene O’Regan, addressed the room.
“My motive in taking some steps towards this day and towards this archive are that primarily our people should have a secured and protected treasure house for future generations.”

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A Natural Fix

At just 24, Lucas Smith has packed a lot of life experience into the six years since he left high school. Kaituhi Rob Tipa caught up with Lucas recently to learn more about his latest venture creating natural wool wound products.
A born entrepreneur, Lucas created and invested his life savings into Walk On, a start-up company using the finest merino wool in Aotearoa for blister protection pads. This led him to establish Wool Aid, a business producing a merino wool, completely biodegradable sticking plaster, thought to be a world first.

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Leading change in education

In Japan, when something precious breaks, they repair it using glue with powdered gold mixed in. That way, when the object is put back together it honours the piece it was before, and makes something more beautiful of the new item. It’s known as kintsugi –
golden repair.
This is how it is with Christchurch, but the gold in our repairs is an increasing acknowledgement of Māori culture and tikanga. As the city regenerates post-quake, organisations and businesses, government agencies and policy makers, architects and landscape designers are all taking the opportunity to layer in Māori history, language, and practices that have been largely ignored in 150-odd years of colonisation. It is giving a voice to Māori, and acknowledging and embedding Ngāi Tahu as mana whenua.

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