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Issue 85

Ngā Hau e Whā
From the Editor

For most Ngāi Tahu the connection to and passion for mahinga kai pulses through their veins – it’s in the DNA. Traditionally the gathering of kai was a huge part of whānau life and survival, and it’s not that different now. Each year when the season comes whānau gravitate to their awa to get themselves a feed of that precious little fish known as īnanga. Sadly, the ongoing degradation of our environment continues to impact negatively on many of our taonga species and whitebait is no exception. There’s no denying there isn’t as much bait around as there used to be, but the government’s recently proposed changes to whitebait management blatantly contravene its legal responsibility to tangata whenua as Treaty partners, and shows disregard for the customary practices that have sustained many generations of whānau. In this issue of TE KARAKA assistant editor Anna Brankin speaks to Ngāi Tahu whitebaiters from around the takiwā to get their views on the matter

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From the CEO
2020 – Extraordinary Times

As governments around the world announce drastic measures to deal with the virus our everyday activities are being altered to prevent its spread. Public gatherings have been limited and a thing called “social distancing” (where people meeting should not be too close together) is the new norm. Hand sanitiser has suddenly gained in popularity, but the effectiveness of facemasks to keep germs in or out or neither is unclear. Our whanaungatanga rituals are ill-advised in the current environment and making modifications is difficult – albeit necessary – as we are forced to stop and think about engagement, hongi, touching or even embracing one another. Greetings like raised eyebrows, touching elbows or simply bowing have become the new rituals.

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Whenua
Waiariki

Waiariki (Stevenson’s Arm) is the picturesque stretch of water in Lake Wānaka between Parakārehu (Stevenson’s Peninsula) and the mainland. In 1844, the southern Ngāi Tahu leader Te Huruhuru drew Waiariki on a map for government agent Edward Shortland, who misinterpreted Waiariki as a separate lake.

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Ka Hao Te Rakatahi
Ko Te Aho Matua te tāhuhu o tōku whare. Ko te reo me ōna tikanga te poutokomanawa. E taku iwi Māori, whītiki tāua!

Today I was asked for my opinion on the Bob Jones trial. If you don’t know about it, cool. But allow me to explain it to you. Long story short, author and businessman Bob Jones sued film-maker Renae Maihi for defamation after she presented a petition to Parliament. A petition with over 90,000 signatures, calling for him to be stripped of his knighthood in response to a column he wrote for the National Business Review in 2018 that suggested Waitangi Day should be renamed “Māori Gratitude Day”. I don’t know about you, but nothing could stop the fire that I felt the moment the words “Māori Gratitude Day” started ringing in my ears.

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